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Subject: "Latest Review Links w/b 15th July 2002" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Conferences What's Happening Topic #2887
Reading Topic #2887
Bruceadmin

15-07-02, 09:45 AM (GMT)
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"Latest Review Links w/b 15th July 2002"
 
  
Each day we add the latest links to reviews and interviews that we find on the major newspaper web sites around the world. If you find a link that we have missed do please post it up, preferably as a URL link.

Last weeks thread:
http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2868.html

Bookmarking this page:
Click on the following link and then bookmark the links page that comes back - it's a special URL that will always bring you to the thread with the latest reviews:
http://www.ballet.co.uk/todayslinks

We should not need to state this but these links are for our readers' use and not for other websites to take and pass off as their own. We ask all visitors to respect Ballet.co's site and the way it operates.


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  Monday Links - 15 July 2002 Bruceadmin 15-07-02 1
     RE: Monday Links - 15 July 2002(2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 15-07-02 2
  Tuesday Links - 16th July 2002 Bruceadmin 16-07-02 3
     RE: Tuesday Links - (2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 16-07-02 4
         RE: Tuesday Links - (3) Brendan McCarthymoderator 16-07-02 5
             RE: Wednesday links - 17th July '02 AnnWilliams 17-07-02 6
                 RE: Wednesday links - 17th July '02 (2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 17-07-02 7
                     RE: Thursday links - 18th July '02 AnnWilliams 18-07-02 8
                         RE: Thursday links - 18th July '02 Bruceadmin 18-07-02 9
                             RE: Friday 19th July '02 AnnWilliams 19-07-02 10
  Saturday Links - 20 July 2002 Bruceadmin 20-07-02 11
  Sunday Links - 21 July 2002 Bruceadmin 21-07-02 12
     RE: Sunday Links - 21 July 2002 (2) AnnWilliams 21-07-02 13
         RE: Sunday Links - 21 July 2002 (2) Tomoko.A 21-07-02 14

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Bruceadmin

15-07-02, 09:47 AM (GMT)
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1. "Monday Links - 15 July 2002"
In response to message #0
 
  
Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
'SWAN' FOR THE AGES
Swan Lake
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Zakharova, Korsuntsev, Gumerova, Kolb
by Clive Barnes
    "The authority that the Kirov, particularly its matchless yet perfectly matched corps de ballet, brings to both dance and fable, is all the more impressive by looking so effortless..."
New York Post

Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
A Temple Dancer at Once Spare and Voluptuous
La Bayadere
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Vishneva, Fadeyev, Pavlenko, Samodurov, Osmolkina, Ponomarev, Ostreikovskaya, Golub, Sologub, Rakhmanova, Baimuradov, Scherbakov
by Jennifer Dunning
    "The Kirov Ballet production of "La Bayadère" is a balletomane's dream, a spectacle filled with opportunities for pure classical dancing as well as familiar thumping and lyrical ballet-classroom music and charming bits of narrative silliness. And performances on Tuesday night and Wednesday afternoon at the Metropolitan Opera House gave New Yorkers a look at the company's youngest stars."
New York Times

Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
A TALE OF THREE CITIES
Jewels: Emeralds, Rubies, Diamonds
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Ayupova, Golub, Vishneva, Zakharova, Pavlenko
by Joan Acocella
    "Compared with Balanchine's style, which we are now so used to, the Russian way of dancing looks old-fashioned, but beautifully so, when it is done right. Those arms are gorgeous, and the deliberateness, too, can be a lot of fun. (When Russian dancers break a number for ovations, they get them.) But going from pose to pose detracts from musical responsiveness—and also from through-line, the sense of a single unfolding. It can make the dancers look stagy, and stodgy. As for the acting, it is sometimes wonderful, as with Baryshnikov, and at other times it's the corniest thing you ever saw."
New Yorker

The Kirov
New York
by Elizabeth Kendall
In this article, from 1992, Elizabeth Kendall profiles the Kirov company shortly after the fall of the Soviet Union.
    "In St. Petersburg last August, in the midst of the coup, three senior dancers of the Kirov Ballet - Elena Evteyeva, Tatiana Terekhova, and Sergei Berezhnoi - went to the Kirov Theatre to give themselves a ballet class. The theatre is a major architectural landmark, even in a city rich with landmarks. Built in 1860 as the czar's Maryinsky Theatre, it looks like the essence of the nineteenth century - sea-green wings and porticoes surrounding a rotunda studded with classical windows and iced with white moldings. Though the Kirov dancers were supposed to be on vacation, it wasn't unusual for small groups of them to go to the theatre to practice. But on this occasion, the three dancers told me later, they were met inside the stage door by a worker who was repairing the auditorium. He told them to leave - that the theatre would be closed during six months of martial law. Terekhova, who is known for her bald way of putting things, stepped forward and confronted him. "Nonsense," she said. "You can't tell us to go away. There was a revolution in 1917, and dancers didn't stop working then. Revolutions will come and go and we'll still be here doing our battements tendus."
http://www.newyorker.com/archive/content/?020722fr_archive01

Robyn Orlin
Out of the darkness
London
Robyn Orlin was a thorn in the side of South Africa's apartheid rulers. The new government isn't too keen on her either. Judith Mackrell meets a dance radical
by Judtih Mackrell
    "To any clued-up fan, the full title of Robyn Orlin's current hit work, Daddy I've Seen This Piece Six Times Before and I Still Don't Know Why They're Hurting Each Other, will suggest a satire on the obfuscation and emotional masochism of certain kinds of modern dance. One strand of the Johannesburg-based choreographer's piece is certainly a parodic take on different dance trends...."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4461311,00.html

San Francisco Ballet
Davis OKs $20 million bond for S.F. Ballet
San Francisco
by David Wiegand
    "About $3.5 million of the amount will go toward new productions, including the long-promised new "Nutcracker," created by Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson, as well as a new full-length ballet by Mark Morris..."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/07/12/DD218039.DTL&type=performance

High art and elitism
A question of discrimination
London
By AC Grayling
High culture is seen by some as the product of a hidebound establishment bent on excluding outsiders. Is it possible to believe in social equality yet defend elitism in the arts?
    "Can people of left-liberal political sympathies believe that high culture has special and superior value which justifies state support for theatre and grand opera, but not for pop concerts or darts competitions? On the face of it the answer is surely "Yes"; even if, after the characteristic British manner, left-leaning votaries of high culture - of opera, Shakespeare, Rembrandt exhibitions, Beethoven concerts, contemporary art and dance, "serious" literature whether contemporary or classical - occasionally mask their interest under an appearance of irony, given the risk that such interests run of being branded affected or pretentious."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/features/story/0,11710,754319,00.html


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

15-07-02, 12:20 PM (GMT)
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2. "RE: Monday Links - 15 July 2002(2)"
In response to message #1
 
   Royal Ballet School

Judith Flanders of the Standard on the RBS show:
"Many of the dancers look promising, and will be watched with interest as they begin their professional lives. At the Royal, the boys looked particularly strong - I liked Paul Kay and Alexander Jones, who both have another year before graduation."
Evening Standard

English National Ballet School

Judith Flanders on ENBS's school show:
"English National Ballet, by contrast, produced an excellent, tightly focused programme, edited down to show only the very best. Everything was selected with an eye to both the dancers' abilities and for how it functioned as part of a greater whole. The lovely Akari Manabe and Sonia Aguilar stood out."  
Evening Standard

Nakissa Dance Company

Judith Flanders on Nakissa at the Linbury:
"Of particular note is Rukmini Chaterjee, the Indian princess, a classical Indian bharathanatyam dancer, whose magnificent stage presence and pure dancing skills take this pleasant evening to altogether a different level."   
Evening Standard


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Bruceadmin

16-07-02, 09:14 AM (GMT)
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3. "Tuesday Links - 16th July 2002"
In response to message #0
 
   English National Ballet School, Royal Ballet School
Poised on the brink of their careers
ENB: Suite Caracteristique, Adagio for Strings, Light Fandango, RBS: Flowers of the Forest, Le Corsair (Jardine anime), Concerto
UK, London, Britten Theatre Covent Garden
Dancers: Aguilar, Hollins, Manabe, Olovyannikov, Murabe
by Clement Crisp
    "This fine school (ENB) has been directed for a decade by Kathryn Wade, a dancer whom I greatly admired. Training is well-rounded, with a notable admixture of French instruction, and there results a dance-style that is musical and unstrained. The ENB School show at the Britten Theatre of the Royal Academy of Music could not be faulted."
Financial Times

Eva Yerbabuena
Caramba! This one's the real tortilla
Eva - Eva Yerbabuena programme
UK, London, Sadler's Wells
Dancers: Yerbabuena
by Jenny Gilbert
    "Hardly a year goes by without some fresh claim being made for the title "Hottest new flamenco talent to come out of Spain". But while it's true that flamenco is enjoying a dramatic renaissance in its home country, centred on the now very hip flamenco clubs in Madrid, it's also true that the acts that get exported are not necessarily the best. A touch of circumspection can be useful when weighing up their various claims. Any act so lacklustre that it needs to be costumed by Giorgio Armani can forget it. And any that claims to be breaking the mould ­ what, again? ­ almost certainly isn't. The first remarkable thing about 31-year-old Eva Yerbabuena is that she makes barely any claims at all. And she, it turns out, is the real tortilla."
Independent

Eva Yerbabuena
Beautiful flamenco without the roughness
Eva - Eva Yerbabuena programme
UK, London, Sadler's Wells
Dancers: Yerbabuena
by Nadine Meisner
    "Eva is no ordinary flamenco show and Eva Yerbabuena is no ordinary flamenco dancer. Some spectators might denounce her as an egotistical control-freak, whose coldness fully matches her adoptive name Yerbabuena - Spanish for "mint".
    "She treats her five supporting dancers like an impersonal corps de ballet for her lengthy solos. And contrary to the traditional spirit of flamenco, she strips them of personality, regimenting them into rigid phalanxes"
Independent

Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
The Kirov, Showing Its Youthful Side
Swan Lake, La Bayadere
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Gumerova, Kolb, Korsakov, Fadeyev, Zakharova, Korsuntsev, Tarasova
by Anna Kisselgoff
    "In the Kirov's current season as part of Lincoln Center Festival 2002, the accent is, as in recent years, on new young ballerinas rather than the men. On Saturday night at the Metropolitan Opera House, Sofia Gumerova, a statuesque dancer with a thoroughbred elegance who came to notice in George Balanchine's works in 1999, was a new Odette-Odile in "Swan Lake," with Igor Kolb as a new and tender prince. Earlier, she offered the most convincing Nikiya of the season when seen for the first time in "La Bayadère" on Wednesday night."
New York Times

Royal Ballet School
Flower Festival at Genzano pdd, Concerto, Le Jardin Anime, Schubertiade, Le Corsair (Jardine anime)
UK, London, Covent Garden
Dancers: Hirata, Kay, Poole, Harrod
by Debra Craine
    "The Royal Ballet School’s end-of-year show may be a showcase for its 200 students, but it’s also a smorgasbord of choreography that offers a far wider range than you would normally see on a professional stage. Bournonville, MacMillan and Petipa’s Le Jardin Animé on the same bill? I was in heaven..."
Times

Russell Page - Bangarra Dance Theatre
Bangarra dancer Russell Page dies
Sydney
By Sharon Verghis
    "Russell Page - acclaimed dancer, choreographer and one of a trinity of talented Aboriginal brothers - has died. He was 34.
    "The Australian arts world was in mourning yesterday as news broke that the talented dancer, one of the creative forces behind Bangarra Dance Theatre, and much lauded for his intense physicality and grace, had passed away in Sydney."
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/07/15/1026185159995.html


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

16-07-02, 12:02 PM (GMT)
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4. "RE: Tuesday Links - (2)"
In response to message #3
 
   LAST EDITED ON 16-07-02 AT 05:28 PM (GMT)

Onegin

Judith Flanders has a review of the RB's Onegin in today's Standard: "Cranko's Onegin has become a classic by stealth here. Long ignored by the Royal Ballet, it has crept into the repertoire almost while we were looking the other way. It is resolutely old-fashioned: plush, velvety sofas cover the stage, cobweb-like lace hovers overhead. And on stage is either a tired old warhorse of honour betrayed, or an emotionally compelling drama of the birth of the anti-hero, depending on who is dancing. When it's Adam Cooper, returned to the Royal for an all-too-short fortnight, the result is a multi-layered portrait of a shallow sophisticate, who suddenly finds that Tatiana, the dull, silly provincial girl he spurned years earlier, has metamorphosed into a woman of substance."
Evening Standard

Gordon Brown's Spending Review

BBC Online reports the extent of the Chancellor's largesse towards the arts - £75 million by 2005-06. "The extra money will widen access to culture and create an "avalanche of art", Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell said in the wake of the announcement."
BBC News Online


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

16-07-02, 05:32 PM (GMT)
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5. "RE: Tuesday Links - (3)"
In response to message #4
 
   LAST EDITED ON 16-07-02 AT 05:33 PM (GMT)

Gordon Brown and the Arts

According to Tony Thorncroft, writing in the FT, the arts have done 'surprisingly well' out of the Chancellor's spending review. "Over the next three years the Arts Council of England is to receive an extra £75m in real terms, lifting its annual grant from £297m in the current year to £412m by 2005-06, a 16 per cent increase after inflation. The council will continue to gets its share of lottery revenue, worth about £240m a year, although this sum has been in slow decline. The council will divide the extra money between its clients - which include arts companies, such as the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, and individual artists - and the Creative Partnerships programme, which brings the arts to children in schools. This scheme was originally funded with £40m, and a pilot in 16 deprived communities, involving 200,000 children, starts in September. Now it will be rolled out to cover more of the country."
Financial Times


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AnnWilliams

17-07-02, 09:04 AM (GMT)
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6. "RE: Wednesday links - 17th July '02"
In response to message #5
 
   The Royal Ballet's 'Onegin'

Judith Mackrell in the Guardian particularly admires Mara Galeazzi's Tatiana..... 'Galeazzi is one of those dancers whose successes you cannot predict. Her technique is never so sure that she can sail through the classics with brilliant ease, yet it is shaped by surprisingly expressive quirks and powered by a resolute private intelligence. As the teenage Tatiana her movements are gauche and mannered, almost to the point where the dancer's first-night nerves merge with the anxiety of the character. ..... In the climactic lift sequence where she flares ecstatically around (Cooper's) neck, Galeazzi, like her character, looks as if she is hurling her heart at the world.'

Http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4462822,00.html

Ismene Brown is admiring, but makes an interesting point:... 'Onegin draws on the Royal Ballet's strengths - its dramatic liveliness, its sense of proper occasion, its stiff upper lip that conceals raging hearts - but it's closer to theatre than many ballets. A directorial eye to intermesh the different interpretations truthfully might elevate it from melodrama to romantic tragedy.'
Http://www.portal.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2002/07/17/btisme17.xml&sSheet=/arts/2002/07/17/ixartleft.html

Debra Craine in The Times sees a different cast and is smitten by Robert Twesley's Onegin.... 'He is a gorgeous dancer (in every way) but there is a lot more to this golden boy than a handsome physique and a sumptuous classical technique. He is a fantastic actor, one of the great Onegins. A supreme narcissist when he first meets Tatiana, then a ravishingly romantic fantasy lover in her dreams.'

Http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,685-358355,00.html

The Kirov in New York

Anna Kisselgoff in the NY Times on the Kirov's 'Don Quixote'...... 'The mystique of the Kirov in St. Petersburg, and its friendly rival, the Bolshoi in Moscow, is such that one is loath to admit that they are not the companies they once were. The Bolshoi's "Don Quixote" in Washington two years ago still had enough vibrancy to evoke some of the old excitement. But chances are that today you will see a better performance of "Don Quixote" by the Paris Opera Ballet or American Ballet Theater than by the Kirov.'

Http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/17/arts/dance/17DON.html


Fiona Marcotty

Jennifer Dunning in the NY Times reviews the quirky-sounding 'You Were, We Are, I Was, I Was'... 'The evening's title comes from a comically overwrought-sounding passage in a Ruth Draper monologue that addresses a male lover. In these duets, Ms. Marcotty explores the dynamics of male-female relationships. The opening sections of "I Have My Moments" have a gawky charm, as Luke Miller and Ashley Smith heave and flail haphazardly to wide-eyed rock songs about teenagers prevented from falling in love.'

Http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/17/arts/dance/17FION.html


Flamenco in San Francisco's Bay Area

Rachel Howard in the San Francisco Examiner on two Flamenco dancers.... 'The Bay Area's two most prominent flamenco dancers are a delicious study in contrasts. La Tania, my favorite, is deeply elegant and decisive -- she takes one of those sudden snap-neck lunges and you jolt backward in your seat, as if to stay the hell out of her way. And yet she doesn't come off as angry, the way some flamenco divas do -- there's a vulnerability beneath the passion.'

Http://www.examiner.com/ex_files/default.jsp?story=X0716BRISASw0

American Ballet Theatre in Los Angeles

Lewis Segal in the Los Angeles Times on ABT's 'Corsaire'.... 'Choreographer Marius Petipa inherited one version and did three major revisions of his own in the 19th century while nearly every new American Ballet Theatre principal at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Friday and Saturday followed his example--not only interpreting the ballet differently, but adding favorite steps as well. Sometimes interacting with previously reviewed artists, they helped make the ballet something like a personal, shrink-to-fit vehicle, enriching a feeble production with their diverse skills and personalities'

Http://www.calendarlive.com/top/1,1419,L-LATimes-Search-X!ArticleDetail-66063,00.html


The New York dance scene this week

Wendy Perron in the Village Voice has mixed feelings about the Kirov's New York season, but she's enthusiastic about their 'Swan Lake'.. '(Svetlana) Zakharova as Odette personified a fugitive bird with human qualities (or is it vice versa?). Every flung arabesque, every split leap seemed a cry for freedom from a creature trapped by a spell. In her adagio with Prince Siegfried, her leg lifted, unfolded, and extended to the back like a flower blooming in a time-lapse sequence. An enthralled quiet blanketed the audience.'

Http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0229/perron.php

Also from the Village Voice, three NY dance performances reviewed respectively by Elisabeth Zimmer, Chris Dohse and Susan Yung. 'E-moves' sounds the most interesting.... 'The third annual "E-Moves" season.... fulfilled its double intention with flair. On Program A, curator Felicia A. Swoope gave prominent dancers a forum for debut choreographies. Program B offered dance makers with a few years' experience a significant platform. The resulting 10 works filled the theater with fierce, vibrant dancing. Some, like Jamie Philbert's Sacred Wall, also told stories. Philbert's powerful, lucid theatricality and fine performers traced a feminist/matriarchal history, from a Trinidadian granny to a Manhattan bag lady.'

Http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0229/footnotes.php

Russell Page

From the Melbourne Age, Hilary Crampton reports the sudden death of dancer Russell Page, brother of choreogarpher Stephen Page.

Http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/07/16/1026802688538.html

...and a further piece piece from The Age

Http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/07/17/1026802706351.html


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

17-07-02, 12:26 PM (GMT)
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7. "RE: Wednesday links - 17th July '02 (2)"
In response to message #6
 
   Bernard Haitink

Norman Lebrecht writes for the Standard on Bernard Haitink's legacy at the ROH. "The tributes have been so fulsome that one hesitates to inject a note of realism - to remind ourselves, for instance, that Haitink has been threatening to resign almost from the moment the ink dried on his contract and that his role in the running of the company has been, at best, peripheral and, with the best intentions in the world, regressive. For all the devotion he invested in the operas he conducted himself, the rest of the operation scarcely felt his guiding hand - except when someone from the ballet or the design shop inadvertently trod on his toes."
The Evening Standard


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AnnWilliams

18-07-02, 08:44 AM (GMT)
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8. "RE: Thursday links - 18th July '02"
In response to message #7
 
   The Royal Ballet

Clement Crisp in the FT on the RB's 'Onegin', which, he says ' is a work that needs a marvellous balance between incandescent performance and extreme subtlety. The choreography's emotional knife-edge must cut into the dancer's feelings, and into ours. With anything less sharp, the piece becomes more kitsch than art, Mills & Boon rather than Pushkin. So, alas, it proved on Monday.'

Http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1026916467336&p=1016625900929

]RB & ENB schools' performances

John Percival in the Independent on the schools' performances. On the RBS: 'On the whole, there seems to be some progress happening under the new RBS directorate, but there is a way to go yet. Anyway the results will never be better than the raw material, and there has been a general shortage of great British dancers emerging lately.'

Http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=315919

New York City Ballet

Robert Gottlieb in the NY Observer on what he sees as NYCB's neglect of its Balanchine legacy.... "much of what's replacing (Balanchine) comes from a very different, often antagonistic, aesthetic. Consider this season's 10th-anniversary Diamond Project. At the Spring Gala, Mr. Martins....... congratulated the company (and himself) on the fact that previous Projects had produced "almost 40 ballets from almost 20 choreographers." No acknowledgment of the fact that not one of those 40 ballets was worth preserving—and, indeed, few of them have been preserved. Nevertheless, 15 Diamond oldies were hauled out for airing, only to have their worthlessness confirmed. There were also eight new pieces—but why anatomize them as if they had any artistic validity? Let's just get them out of the way."
Http://www.observer.com/pages/dance.asp

The Kirov in New York

The NY Daily News on the Kirov's 'Don Q' in NewYork (the writer is uncredited): 'As Kitri, Diana Vishneva is spectacular. She dances with a joy, a serenity and a vigor that makes all the difficult steps seem natural expressions of a young woman's passion.'

Http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/culture/story/3544p-3185c.html

Dairakudakan

Jennifer Dunning in the NY Times on the Japanese dance group: 'What makes it all work so wonderfully is the performers' immense skill, their deft timing and unself-consciousness and their individuality. There are infrequent glimpses of traditional Butoh and its exploration of raw primeval darkness at the heart of modern life, at least for a culture formed in part by the horrors of Hiroshima.'

Http://www.nytimes.com/ads/amexpopup_ftp.html

Bummer in the City

Rachel Howard in the San Francisco Examiner on the West Wave Dance Festival in SF. Since 'Bummer in the City' is what she actuall titles her piece, it is fairly evident that she doesn't think too highly of the event (to put it mildly).

Http://www.examiner.com/ex_files/default.jsp?story=X0717WAVEw

The Diaries of Vasclav Nijinski

Margaret Berry in Filmcritic.com on 'The Diaries of Vasclav Nijinski'. You can tell she doesn't like it: 'Viewers suffer through a 92-minute montage of clichéd images -- fields of wheat, diaphanous skirts, birds in flight -- as narrator Derek Jacobi reads from Nijinsky's diaries. As one might imagine, insane ramblings make for poor monologue'

Http://www.filmcritic.com/misc/emporium.nsf/2a460f93626cd4678625624c007f2b46/0508bfe7a073d14f88256bf700678bf7?OpenDocument


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Bruceadmin

18-07-02, 05:13 PM (GMT)
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9. "RE: Thursday links - 18th July '02"
In response to message #8
 
   >Dairakudakan
>
>Jennifer Dunning in the NY Times
>on the Japanese dance group:
> 'What makes it all
>work so wonderfully is the
>performers' immense skill, their deft
>timing and unself-consciousness and their
>individuality. There are infrequent glimpses
>of traditional Butoh and its
>exploration of raw primeval darkness
>at the heart of modern
>life, at least for a
>culture formed in part by
>the horrors of Hiroshima.'

The orginal URL seemed to misdirect me - this one seems to work:
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/18/arts/dance/18BUTO.html


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AnnWilliams

19-07-02, 09:17 AM (GMT)
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10. "RE: Friday 19th July '02"
In response to message #9
 
   The Royal Ballet

John Percival in the Independent finds the RB's 'Onegin' disappointing: '... thinking back not so many years to when London Festival Ballet used to dance Onegin, I remember every single role being better done there. I suspect that we would be better off if we heard less from the Royal Ballet director Ross Stretton about energy, and more about communication. The priorities are wrong.'

Http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/reviews/story.jsp?story=316045

Robin Orlin Dance Group

Ismene Brown in the Telegraph on the RODG at the Barbican: 'Orlin peppers all sorts of targets - ballet, colour, government, images of beauty, public gullibility - but no more sharply than early-evening radio revue. The best scenes stand out effortlessly - the lovely black girl seen at the start dons a white tutu and softly sifts white flour over her limbs as she walks, making a trail of "white" footprints. This is ravishingly sad, and the amateur Busby Berkeley sequence with the motley cast wearing leopard-print scanties is jolly funny.'

Http://www.portal.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2002/07/19/btdance.xml&sSheet=/arts/2002/07/19/ixartleft.html

..and Donald Hutera in the Times on RODG: 'Orlin's barbed cabaret style always seems on the verge of chaos. It's low-tech to the point of tackiness, with reading lamps and coloured gels manipulated by the performers. Yet Orlin uses video monitors with wit and sophistication. A Busby Berkeley production number, seen both live and onscreen from overhead, is a hoot.'

Http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,685-359446,00.html

Russell Page

Sharon Verghis in the Sydney Morning Herald reports on the public memorial service for the late dancer: 'Grief was sublimated, briefly, in happier memories. Page was an amateur daredevil and a truly "deadly" footballer, often sneaking off from dance practice to play touch footy with Redfern's street kids. Friends spoke of a young dancer fresh from Brisbane, aghast at the idea of having to wear tights when performing.'

Http://www.smh.com.au/text/articles/2002/07/18/1026898889862.htm

And Jill Sykes' obiturary of Russell Page in the SMH : 'He... had a wider family in the dance world - especially among his colleagues at Bangarra, which is a family of its own - and in all those audiences who valued what he gave to their lives from the stage. Right up until the day before he died. We will all miss him.'

Http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/07/17/1026898863586.html

Eiko and Koma

Jack Anderson in the NY Times reports on the veteran Japanase couple's latest NY piece: 'Throughout the dance, dirt kept falling from the structure's sides with rustling noises. But Koma also poured fresh dirt on it. After helping Ms. Aysola down from it, he returned and placed lighted candles near Eiko who remained on the altar. The candles burned on. At last, the music stopped and Koma again offered his assistance, this time helping Eiko to the ground'

Http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/19/arts/dance/19EIKO.html

Irish dancing in Oz

Chris Johnston in Melbourne's 'The Age' on Aussie Irish dancing champ Mark Rafter... 'Growing up in Broadmeadows and then Wantirna South, Irish dancing wasn't the coolest thing to do. In fact, it was highly uncool. So at 14 Rafter ditched the dance to play football, silencing the endless ribbing from his mates.
"I was getting stirred up at high school. Being called a pansy and all that," he says.'

Http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/07/17/1026898864003.html


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Bruceadmin

20-07-02, 11:21 AM (GMT)
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11. "Saturday Links - 20 July 2002"
In response to message #0
 
   LAST EDITED ON 20-07-02 AT 11:50 AM (GMT)

Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
The Kirov Sparkles in a New Turn With Balanchine
Jewels: Emeralds, Rubies, Diamonds
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Zakharova, Vishneva, Gumerova, Samodurov, Ayupova, Baranov, Yakovlev, Part, Korsuntsev
by Anna Kisselgoff
    'Jewels' capped by an astonishingly magical performance by Svetlana Zakharova on Thursday night, is the latest work by George Balanchine to be performed by the Kirov Ballet in New York...."
New York Times

Kirov Ballet (Kirov)
Classic in retrograde
La Bayadere
USA, New York, Metropolitan Opera House
Dancers: Zakharova, Kolb, Tarasova
by Marcia B. Siegel
    Although the Kirov production labored on for three and a half hours, it somehow didn’t seem grand enough. Processions introduced several scenes, but they looked skimpy and rushed, as if on opening night the company hadn’t adjusted its timing to the huge stage of the Metropolitan Opera House. The group dances in diverse styles seemed like diligent exercises, each with an exotic twist or device — a garland dance, a dance for girls with parrots on sticks, a dance for a girl balancing a water jug on her head. As they streamed out one after another, they looked more and more academic to me.
Boston Phoenix

Lyon Opera Ballet
Lyon troupe gives dance new
Bolero, Un Ballo, Stamping Ground, Critical Mass
USA, Boston, Jacob's Pillow
Dancers: Causse, Pomero
by Karen Campbell
    Despite its name, Lyon Opera Ballet doesn't present classical ballet in the traditional sense, nor is its work connected to opera. Though the French company's technique is grounded in ballet, its mission, under the direction of Yorgos Loukos, is to stretch the boundaries of dance.
    Wednesday night's dynamite performance by the company at Jacob's Pillow featured works by Nederlands Dans Theater director Jiri Kylian, up-and-coming British choreographer Russell Maliphant, and Australian choreographer/ Pina Bausch alumna Meryl Tankard.
Boston Globe

Robyn Orlin Dance Group
Daddy I’ve seen this piece six times before and I still don’t know why they’re hurting each other...
UK, London, Barbican Pit
Dancers: Orlin
by Nicholas De Jong
    "With speech, drama, caricature and dance, she pokes fun at some of our most sacred cows - ballet and ethnic traditions, middle-aged white women and buxom black ones. Back stage luvvies and African serving boys are also in the mix, as is a traditional English sword dance team whose intricate daisy-chain dancing is every bit as complex as Balanchine's choreography, albeit with a much beefier gait."
Evening Standard

Sally Silvers
Along the Skidmark of Recorded History, Little Lieutenant, Shouting Out Loud
USA, Boston, Concord Academy
Dancers: Silvers, Weeks, Joyce
by Marcia B. Siegel
    NEW YORK DOWNTOWN DANCER Sally Silvers, who opened a three-week Meet the Artist performance series Thursday night at Concord Academy, was the perfect antidote to the Kirov’s long-winded artfulness.
Boston Phoenix

Marcelo Gomes, American Ballet Theatre
Hooked on a classic
ABT's Marcelo Gomes leaps into the role he's always wanted
New York
By Gia Kourlas
    "Gomes's buoyant jumps, endless legs and clean technique allow him to easily handle Balanchine's demanding roles. Moreover, he is an uninhibited actor, capable of imparting a diverse range of emotions. Take the time he performed Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake in a matinee (it was his debut in the role), and then went on that evening to reprise his part of Von Rotbart, the ballet's sinister magician. He's also proven he can move easily into the work of contemporary choreographers like Twyla Tharp and Mark Morris."
http://www.timeoutny.com/dance/351/351.dance.gomes.open.html

Nikita Dolgushin, Rimsky-Korsakov State Opera and Ballet Theatre
Swan Lake and Giselle productions
St Petersberg
by Anastasia Boreiko
    ""Swan Lake's" original choreography is largely unknown and that which is regarded as the classical choreography is actually Lev Ivanov's 1895 adaptation. Dolgushin chose to take the path less traveled and express his own unique and captivating choreographic approach in the performance.
    "This highly intellectual and intricate approach, along with extraordinary choreography, creates a magical spectacle for all audiences."
http://www.sptimesrussia.com/archive/times/787/features/a_6941.htm

Irene Lidova - Obituary
London
    "Russian émigré who embodied French ballet and who turned brilliant unknowns into world stars
    "Although she never danced a step on stage, Irène Lidova embodied the soul of French ballet for a half-century from the Second World War onwards. She helped to found or maintain companies, discovered dancers and choreographers, publicised their achievements, and with her photographer husband, Serge Lido, formed a record of French and international ballet over four decades."
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,1-45-359512,00.html

Russell Page
Loved ones left wondering why a dazzling talent is gone
By Gabriella Coslovich
    "His dauntless energy would transform itself into a breathtaking talent. In later life, it would be dance critics who would marvel at his bold aerial feats, explosive jumps and seductive moves. From humble beginnings in the working class Brisbane suburb of Mount Gravatt arose one of the finest - some say the finest - dancer Australia has known."
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2002/07/19/1026898913497.html

Dance Collective's Summer Outreach Program
Internship keeps Hub teens on their toes
Boston
by Theodore Bale
    "When you're a teenager, finding a meaningful summer job is certainly a challenge. And if you're a teenager looking to enter the field of professional dance, a relevant gig is even harder to pin down.
    "For six weeks this summer, though, eight lucky teens from the Hub are touring with the celebrated company Dance Collective - and they're getting paid for their participation."
http://www2.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/danc07192002.htm


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Bruceadmin

21-07-02, 06:08 AM (GMT)
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12. "Sunday Links - 21 July 2002"
In response to message #0
 
   We are experimenting with the best way to handle reviews that cover many companies - not sure any of the ways is ideal however!

Royal Ballet (RB)
Onegin
UK, London, Covent Garden
Dancers: Galeazzi, Cooper, Burn, Putrov
by David Dougill
    You hear quibbles about the old-fashioned nature of this ballet, but I have yet to experience a performance when the audience does not leave throbbing with pleasure.
    (part of a review of many companies)
Sunday Times

Royal Ballet (RB)
Have you put the cad out yet?
Onegin
UK, London, Covent Garden
Dancers: Galeazzi, Cooper, Kobborg, Cojocaru, Putrov, Burn
by Jann Parry
    On Wednesday came Johan Kobborg's Onegin, in deeper shades of darkness. Dangerously acute, he knew that Alina Cojocaru's Tatiana was unfulfilled by married life. In their final duet, he showed her (and us) what huge, passionate potential she has
    (part of a review of many companies)
Observer

Royal Ballet School, English National Ballet School
RBS: Concerto, Le Corsaire, ENB: Suite Caracteristique
UK, London, Covent Garden, Britten Theatre
Dancers: Harrod, Poole, Ondiviela, Kay
by Jann Parry
    RBS: What we saw were well-drilled foot soldiers, stronger than in previous years, but two-dimensional in presentation.
    ENB:The 39 students at the English National Ballet School had the advantage of working with choreographers for their end-of-year show
    (part of a review of many companies)
Observer

Royal Ballet School, English National Ballet School
RBS: Schubertiade, Flower Festival at Genzano pdd, Le corsaire (Jardin Anime), Concerto, ENB: Suite Caracteristique
UK, London, Covent Garden, Britten Theatre
Dancers: Hirata, Kay, Harrod, Sardo, Egami, Poole, Aguilar, Murabe
by David Dougill
    RBS: ...there was still a full and varied programme, with younger talents on show, and some evidence, as well, of overstretching.
    (part of a review of many companies)
Sunday Times

Robyn Orlin Dance Group
Daddy I’ve seen this piece six times before and I still don’t know why they’re hurting each other...
UK, London, Barbican Pit
by Jann Parry
    Kitsch and witty, the show subverts political and artistic pretensions of harmony.
    (part of a review of many companies)
Observer

Robyn Orlin Dance Group
Daddy I’ve seen this piece six times before and I still don’t know why they’re hurting each other...
UK, London, Barbican Pit
by David Dougill
    The show was uneven (that’s anarchy), but chiefly fun.
    (part of a review of many companies)
Sunday Times

James Canfield - Oregon Ballet Theater
A Risk-Taking Choreographer Is on the Move
New York
By GIA KOURLAS
    ""I'm an entertainer — and I don't think that's a bad word," he said. "I always wanted to capture the MTV generation because I think in video, the evolution of song is now a short film. It's no longer about words as much as it is the video that's attached to it. My inspiration is about using the discipline of the art form and pop culture. I don't even want to think I'm Balanchine."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/21/arts/dance/21KOUR.html

YEVGENY PANFILOV
A Murder in Russia, and Dance Is Bereft
New York
By JOHN ROCKWELL
    "EVGENY PANFILOV was a charismatic and popular modern-dance choreographer in Russia, largely unknown in this country. But the news, read on the Internet Monday morning, that at the age of 47 he had been stabbed to death last weekend in his apartment in the Urals city of Perm came as a personal shock.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/21/arts/dance/21ROCK.html


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AnnWilliams

21-07-02, 10:27 AM (GMT)
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13. "RE: Sunday Links - 21 July 2002 (2)"
In response to message #12
 
   Today's Sunday Telegraph contains a lenghty interview by Louise Levene of Ivan Putrov. No link available, sadly, but here's an extract:

'I tentatively suggest that the sudden rush of work under Stretton's directorship might simply have coincided with his own greater physical maturity but he doesn't buy that at all - "the last time I'd been dancing Swan Lake , I was in the corps, this time I'm the Prince. I can't have improved that much! Ross definitely gives me more, and the more you do the more you are going to improve yourself".


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Tomoko.A

21-07-02, 01:57 PM (GMT)
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14. "RE: Sunday Links - 21 July 2002 (2)"
In response to message #13
 
   Also, in Sunday Express Marianela Nunez is interviewed by Jeffery Taylor. The Express is doing a special offer for Coppelia on 31 July and 1 August. You can buy a ticket in the Orchestra Stalls or Grand Tier at a 30% discount, i.e. £46. Quote this offer when you ring the box office. Obviouly there are a lot of tickets still available for Coppelia. But I heard they were selling Onegin tickets at a half price too.


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