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Subject: "The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Conferences What's Happening Topic #2882
Reading Topic #2882
alison

11-07-02, 06:15 PM (GMT)
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"The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up"
 
   I've just got round to finishing off last week's reviews, and thought that the following shouldn't be allowed to go without comment. I think this extract about says it all, and ADs all over the world should take note! (Sorry, I was unable to transfer the link across).

A timely essay by Jack Anderson for the NY Times. "Many factors must be taken into account in selecting dances for mixed bills. First, there are the dancers. No dancer should be overworked during an evening. Neither should anyone be overlooked. At least some of a company's stars should be given chances to shine at each performance. There should be a balance between works with small casts and works for large ensembles. Companies like the New York City Ballet that offer subscription series must make sure that subscribers have chances to see lots of different ballets. And the dances should form harmonious combinations. Mixed programs often feature three substantial works: an opener, a middle ballet and a closer. Ballet companies sometimes add a fourth piece, a virtuosic pas de deux to provide an extra bit of sparkle. There can also be satisfying double bills and quadruple bills. But programs with more than four works run the risk of seeming unduly fragmentary."
New York Times


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up Paul A 12-07-02 1
     RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up Brendan McCarthymoderator 12-07-02 2
         RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up alison 12-07-02 3

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Paul A

12-07-02, 10:37 AM (GMT)
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1. "RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up"
In response to message #0
 
   Alison, thanks for highlighting this.

The large number of works in shifting permutations a la NYCB is surely the model - and a very tempting one.

My wife is always perplexed that we don't have something comparable here: she certainly finds much more interest in a triple bill.

RB/ ENB/ BRB all have an interesting back-catalogue - shame we don't see more of it.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

12-07-02, 10:42 AM (GMT)
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2. "RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up"
In response to message #1
 
   LAST EDITED ON 12-07-02 AT 10:44 AM (GMT)

The piece by Jack Anderson that impressed Alison is on this link


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alison

12-07-02, 01:11 PM (GMT)
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3. "RE: The art of selecting a mixed bill - follow-up"
In response to message #2
 
   Thanks, Brendan.

Actually, there is one thing missing from the bit I quoted - reasonable length of bill. RB bills in the past have ranged from under 1 1/2 hours' total dancing time to way too long in my humble opinion. The pieces should be long enough that people feel they've had their money's worth but not so long that people have to dash out part way through the last piece in order to get home (says she with memories of excessively long RB bills and ones where the ballets were only about 20 minutes long!).


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