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Subject: "What have we got that they haven't?" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Conferences What's Happening Topic #2724
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Flight

11-05-02, 03:09 PM (GMT)
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"What have we got that they haven't?"
 
   This afternoon, after failing to get rid of a friend who insisted on reading magazines in my bedroom, I decided to ignore her as much as possible and pretend she wasn't there. So I put on a video of Ruzimatov and Assylmuratova in the solos and coda of the Corsaire pdd, and in an attempt to involve her in my ecstatic state I said 'watch this, it's amazing.' As I sat there in raptures watching Farukh, all she could do was stand there with her arms folded. I prompted her, saying 'wouldn't you love to be able to do that?'. She said 'I can't, I haven't got the right shoes.'

I then became rather worried that she had no soul, so I decided to double-check by putting on Viviana in the Rose Adagio and Beauty coda - carefully chosen for being a breath-stealer. By this time she couldn't even be bothered to watch, and began to look out of the window into my back garden. I repeatedly tried to catch her attention and get her to look at the TV screen, but every time she did she just looked away again. She did once ask 'Don't you get bored watching this?' (I didn't answer).

I can't understand it. What is it that makes me able to sit and watch that pas de deux six times over (which I did, to get on her nerves) and still be enthralled, while she won't even watch it once? How can she bear not to watch Farukh and Viviana? What is it that makes us ballet anoraks and other intelligent, piano-playing (in her case) people be bored stiff?


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: What have we got that they haven't? sylvia 11-05-02 1
     RE: What have we got that they haven't? AEHandley 12-05-02 2
         RE: What have we got that they haven't? Helen 12-05-02 3
             RE: What have we got that they haven't? Flight 12-05-02 4
                 RE: What have we got that they haven't? Helen 12-05-02 5
                     RE: What have we got that they haven't? Flight 12-05-02 6
             RE: What have we got that they haven't? PhilipBadmin 13-05-02 7
                 RE: What have we got that they haven't? Robert 14-05-02 8

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sylvia

11-05-02, 05:34 PM (GMT)
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1. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #0
 
   I found your post so funny Flight! I tried the same with one of my flatmates last year and made her watch my favourite parts of the ROH opening gala. She found Darcey's Rose Adagio "boring" and Viviana and Angel's R&J balcony pdd "too slow". Grrrr!!! She did like Raymonda which came right after though "because it's like Riverdance, isn't it?" ???!!! Anyway, I don't have an answer to your question. At the most basic level in Darcey's Rose Adage, just being able to do those balances is pretty awesome stuff, and doing them with musicality, flow, and all with glowing smile and your face and lifting my heart is what makes me love ballet more than anything. I think it's a matter of getting people to appreciate these things, not only how beautiful ballet can be, but the years of hardwork the dancers put into it and the effort they go into hiding that hard work. Or else it just comes down to different tastes because there will always be some you can never win over.


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AEHandley

12-05-02, 06:23 PM (GMT)
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2. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #1
 
   When I took my husband to see (among other things) Rhapsody (Viviana and Acosta)he was very unimpressed - it wasn't spectacular. When I said that doesn't mean it's easy he said he didn't think that the point was to be impressed by all the hard work that had to be gone through to do it, the point was whether it looked good at the end - and to him this didn't. I think he has a point, actually, so I don't think your "appreciation of all the hard work" etc argument will do it. I don't understand how anyone can fail to be moved by dance. It's the most fundamental art form IMO.


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Helen

12-05-02, 07:53 PM (GMT)
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3. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #2
 
   It is strange, though, how people who assume that orchestral concerts, opera and art galleries are a way of life often have no interest in ballet, or any knowledge of it. I have a bright friend who asked me to "explain it" to her. I couldn't, and have been trying to think of a way of doing so ever since. My feeling is that if you don't get the point, no amount of explanation will help. If she had been going to like ballet, she would like it by now! (She's 60.) Musicality, imagination? I just don't know. I think there is a tendency for people like her (and she is very intelligent) to approach it intellectually, which doesn't seem to work.

I gave up trying to convert people ages ago!


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Flight

12-05-02, 08:02 PM (GMT)
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4. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #3
 
   But you are intelligent. Sylvia is intelligent.

Clement Crisp said in the seventies: 'some people are put off because they they think they have got to 'umderstand' or look for some hidden meaning. This is the wrong approach: look at ballet as you would look at the Olympic Games, and you will immediately enjoy it, and with enjoyment comes understanding of the beauties of dancing'.

I don't like ballet to be compared the sport, but the jist of it is right. (Don't ask me how I know what Clement Crisp said in the seventies when I was born in 1986).


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Helen

12-05-02, 08:14 PM (GMT)
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5. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #4
 
   Oh, I didn't mean to say that people who like ballet aren't intelligent! Far from it. I was implying that in order to appreciate it you need something (I suggested musicality and imagination) IN ADDITION to intelligence.


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Flight

12-05-02, 08:24 PM (GMT)
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6. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #5
 
   Mmmm. Do you think anyone would mind if I just did the imagination and musicality?


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PhilipBadmin

13-05-02, 09:38 AM (GMT)
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7. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #3
 
   >
It is strange, though, how people who assume that orchestral concerts, opera and art galleries are a way of life often have no interest in ballet, or any knowledge of it. I have a bright friend who asked me to "explain it" to her. I couldn't, and have been trying to think of a way of doing so ever since.
<

So true. Although too many of those people have no interest BECAUSE they have no knowledge of it. And they have no knowledge of it because they have never bothered to go just once. I find that many people find live performance of ballet infinitely more interesting than video/TV. Which is quite unlike sport where most people get almost as turned on by watching it on TV.
So someone who has never actually gone to a live ballet performance shouldn't ask for ballet to be "explained" to them. How could one explain the point of music, or poetry or cubism? Why bother - just go have a look-see for yourself, I say!

Blimey, I even went to a mime performance last year just in case I found it interesting - now that's open-minded!

Just my $0.02.


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Robert

14-05-02, 06:28 PM (GMT)
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8. "RE: What have we got that they haven't?"
In response to message #7
 
   Flight
I loved your description of the frustrations and angst of your age group.
Think of what it is like to be a man who likes ballet. For most of my life admitting to an interest in ballet usually suggested you were homosexual. Now I am old and a grandfather it is obvious that I was not and as you get older you do not care what people think.
Do not give up on your friend, lots of young people profess to be uninterested or hate things and later they change their minds. I am sure a lot of Balletco contributors hated ballet at your age and then fell in love with it later. To my shame as a student I threw a firework into the classical music society meeting but ballet a concert pianistís daughter, promenade concerts, my wife and a musical son changed all that.


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