HomeMagazineListingsUpdateLinksContexts

 


 Ballet.co Postings Pages

 Some Special Threads:
  GPDTalk about George Piper Dances ! NEW !
  NBTTalk about Northern Ballet Theatre
  SBTalk about Scottish Ballet
  ENBTalk about English National Ballet
  BRBTalk about Birmingham Royal Ballet
  TodaysLinks - worldwide daily dance links
  Ballet.co GetTogethers - meetings and drinks...

  Help on New Postings


Subject: "best ballet books" Archived thread - Read only
 
  Previous Topic | Next Topic
Printer-friendly copy     Email this topic to a friend    
Conferences What's Happening Topic #2605
Reading Topic #2605
jhanner

01-04-02, 08:56 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail jhanner Click to send private message to jhanner Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
"best ballet books"
 
   Can people suggest their favourite ballet reads? Any suggestions -biographies, histories, artistic comment , even fiction (although I'm not sure how much of that there is) welcome.

I have read a variety of books that are readily available, I'd welcome more suggestions from other ballet.co'ers. Is Dance books the best source of out of print/rare books in the UK?

Reading Vivianes' thread about Anastasia put me in mind of this as someone mentioned how good Lynne Seymour's biography was. Also in the telegraph yesterday, there was reference to a reprint/new issue (?) of a biography of Pushkin, Nureyev/Baryshnikovs' mentor. Is this available yet (I threw away the paper before checking!)?


  Printer-friendly page | Top

  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: best ballet books AEHandley 01-04-02 1
     RE: best ballet books Flight 01-04-02 2
     RE: best ballet books Viviane 01-04-02 3
         RE: best ballet books Tomoko.A 01-04-02 4
             RE: best ballet books Jonathan S 02-04-02 5
                 RE: best ballet books Brendan McCarthymoderator 02-04-02 6
                     RE: best ballet books Flight 02-04-02 7
                         RE: best ballet books alison 05-04-02 31
                     RE: best ballet books Viviane 02-04-02 8
                         RE: best ballet books Brendan McCarthymoderator 02-04-02 9
                             RE: best ballet books AnnWilliams 02-04-02 10
                             RE: best ballet books alison 05-04-02 32
                         RE: best ballet books Paul A 02-04-02 12
                             RE: best ballet books Brendan McCarthymoderator 02-04-02 13
                             RE: best ballet books Paul A 02-04-02 15
                             RE: best ballet books Viviane 02-04-02 17
                             RE: best ballet books Paul A 02-04-02 18
                             RE: best ballet books Viviane 02-04-02 19
                             RE: best ballet books Paul A 03-04-02 20
                             RE: best ballet books Viviane 03-04-02 22
                             RE: best ballet books David L 07-04-02 35
             RE: best ballet books AEHandley 02-04-02 11
                 RE: best ballet books Helen 02-04-02 14
                     RE: best ballet books Flight 02-04-02 16
                         RE: best ballet books Flight 03-04-02 21
  RE: best ballet books Viviane 03-04-02 23
     RE: best ballet books Helen 03-04-02 24
         RE: best ballet books Flight 04-04-02 25
             RE: best ballet books Viviane 04-04-02 26
                 RE: best ballet books Flight 04-04-02 27
                     RE: best ballet books Helen 04-04-02 28
                         RE: best ballet books sylvia 04-04-02 29
  RE: best ballet books Ann Welsh 04-04-02 30
     RE: best ballet books Robert 05-04-02 33
         RE: best ballet books Flight 05-04-02 34
             RE: best ballet books Jonathan S 08-04-02 36
                 RE: best ballet books David L 08-04-02 37
                     RE: best ballet books Jonathan S 16-04-02 53
                 RE: best ballet books alison 10-04-02 42
  RE: best ballet books Justin 08-04-02 38
     RE: best ballet books Robert 08-04-02 39
         RE: best ballet books Flight 09-04-02 40
     RE: best ballet books alison 10-04-02 41
         RE: best ballet books Pete 11-04-02 43
             RE: best ballet books katharine kanter 11-04-02 44
             RE: best ballet books alison 11-04-02 45
                 RE: best ballet books Flight 14-04-02 46
                     RE: best ballet books alison 15-04-02 47
                         RE: best ballet books Helen 15-04-02 48
                         RE: best ballet books Helen 15-04-02 49
                             RE: best ballet books Flight 15-04-02 50
                             RE: best ballet books Tomoko.A 15-04-02 51
                             RE: best ballet books sylvia 16-04-02 52
                             RE: best ballet books MAB 16-04-02 54
                             RE: best ballet books Brendan McCarthymoderator 16-04-02 55
                             RE: best ballet books Shantrice 19-04-02 56
                             RE: best ballet books Paul A 22-04-02 57
                             RE: best ballet books Viviane 22-04-02 58
                             RE: best ballet books Tomoko.A 22-04-02 59
                             RE: best ballet books Viviane 23-04-02 60
                             RE: best ballet books sylvia 23-04-02 62
                             Libraries alison 23-04-02 63
                             RE: Libraries Viviane 23-04-02 64
                             RE: best ballet books Bruceadmin 23-04-02 67
                             RE: best ballet books Robert 23-04-02 65
                             RE: best ballet books Paul A 23-04-02 66
  RE: best ballet books Justin 23-04-02 61
  NEW THREAD STARTED Bruceadmin 23-04-02 68
  RE: best ballet books balletbabe 29-04-02 69

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
AEHandley

01-04-02, 09:31 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail AEHandley Click to send private message to AEHandley Click to add this user to your buddy list  
1. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   >Can people suggest their favourite ballet
>reads? Any suggestions -biographies, histories,
>artistic comment , even fiction
>(although I'm not sure how
>much of that there is)
>welcome.
>
On the "even fiction" note, I have to admit to having enjoyed the deeply trashy "The Turning Point", book of the film with Baryshnikov, Shirley MacLaine, Ann Bancroft and a wonderful cameo by Antoinette Sibley. Completely forgotten who wrote it, though. And of course there's always Noel Streatfeild's "Ballet Shoes"...

I read a lot of ballet biographies/autobiogs about 20 yrs ago and recently read a VERY thick biog of Nureyev (written after his death) which was frankly too detailed for me (I skipped the whole early bit and only read the section after he defected). Read Margot's autobiog and a highly partial biography of Beryl Grey - but it was Seymour's autobiog that leapt off the page at me. Good luck with your search for a copy!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

01-04-02, 10:29 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
2. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #1
 
   Was the Nureyev one Diane Soloway's 'Nureyev - His Life'? It is quite heavy - a large chunk details the history of Russia.But it does have lovely pictures. For a good Nureyev biog., read 'The dancer Who Flew' by Linda Maybarduk (although it is really supposed to be for children).

Darcy Bussell's Judith Mackrell collaboration is an interesting, light read. And all of the old ballet annuals!

For fiction, try Lorna Hill's 1950s Sadlers Wells series if you can get hold of them. There are around ten and they are a good insight into the school at that time - Hill's daughter was a student there.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

01-04-02, 10:42 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
3. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #1
 
   LAST EDITED ON 01-04-02 AT 10:45 PM (GMT)

Jhanner, I think Dance Books is an evident and good source for rare books.
More common books you can easily find in numerous secondhand and 'end of series'-shops in London, or at the bookfairs, held monthly. Try 'Bookends' and 'Henry Pordes' at Charing Cross Road and don't give up after a few, resultless visits...!
Those are my major sources for books...and, not at all expensive.
Personally I love the books by Richard Buckle ('Diaghilev'and others)...although I have to read them in parts...
At the moment I try to read as much about 'Les Ballets-Russes'
and try to put the whole picture together with info on costumes and settings.
My latest London-visit offered me an intriguing and quite rare "The birth of Ballets-Russes" (1936) by Prince Peter Lieven, I haven't finished it yet...but love it !
And I also found the catalog of the '69 Sothebys sale on Diaghilev.
Overhere I discovered 'Roland Petit - Un Choréographe et ses peintres' - Gérard Mannoni...what a treasure and what a wealth to discover lots of paralels with 'Les Ballets Russes'.

Last year I've read "The private world of ballet" by Johan Gruen (75). About 50 dancers (all 'big' names' gave their view on ballet, easy to read in 'pieces' and recreate the ambiance of those days. Bernard Taper's "Balanchine", is already on my list for a re-read !

To talk about more recent books, I loved Deborah Bull's book but couldn't finish Darcey's !
I liked "Nureyev- His life" by Diane Solway although I liked the view by Rudi van Dantzig on Nureyev more (don't know if it's been published in English).
So far, I'm not so enthusiastic about Plisetskaya's autobiography...I want to skip some passages...

And I have so many...waiting until it's summer-holiday
Oh, and I forgot this, in case you like something to read about teaching : "The art of teaching ballet" Ten Twentieth-Century Masters by Gretchen Ward Warren.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Tomoko.A

01-04-02, 11:34 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Tomoko.A Click to send private message to Tomoko.A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
4. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #3
 
   I enjoyed "Once a dancer" by Allegra Kent and "Dancing on my grave" by Gelsey Kirkland. Suzanne Farrel's autobiograply moved me completely. I'm just reading Plisetskaya's autobiography, but like Viviane, I'm not so impressed. (too much politics for me!)
Tetsuya Kumakawa's autobiography was very interesting, but unfortunately available only in Japanese. I've got the new Isadora Duncan's biography by Peter Kurth, but I haven't started it yet. Has anyone read it ? And I'm really looking forward to MacMillan's biography by J.Perry (?). When will it be published ?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan S

02-04-02, 05:52 AM (GMT)
Click to add this user to your buddy list  
5. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #4
 
   My favourite for a long time was Braunsweg's Ballet Scandals: The Life of an Impresario and the Story of Festival Ballet (1973) by Julian Braunsweg. I also recommend Lynn (1984)Lynn Seymour's autobiography. If you like the Ballets Russes era, Lynn Garafola's Diaghilev's Ballets Russes (1989) is a good read. Free on the internet is Julie van Camp's Philosophical Problems of Dance Criticism - it's a doctoral dissertation, but very readable, and fascinating.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

02-04-02, 08:56 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
6. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #5
 
   LAST EDITED ON 02-04-02 AT 08:58 AM (GMT)

Julie Kavanagh's 'Secret Muses', her biography of Ashton, deserves a place on any list. Read it in tandem with David Vaughan's 'Frederick Ashton and his Ballets'.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

02-04-02, 09:09 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
7. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #6
 
   Suzanne Farrell's 'Holding on to the Air' is very well written (unlike Darcy's!). So is the Debbie Bull one. It's very interesting, not just about ballet but a bit on politics and things.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

05-04-02, 01:21 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
31. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #7
 
   Haven't read the former, but agree on the latter. Make sure you buy the paperback, though, as it has maybe an extra 25% of updates that isn't in the hardback (and helps to take some of the emphasis away from Bull helping to launch the new Rolls-Royce, which I felt on a first read took up a bit too much space for my personal liking).


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

02-04-02, 09:34 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
8. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #6
 
   Oh dear, I'm saving this 'big one' for a long holiday...is Vaughan's as elaborate ?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

02-04-02, 09:36 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
9. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #8
 
   Viviane, Julie Kavanagh's book is a biography, while Vaughan's focuses much more on the choreography itself. It is a long read.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
AnnWilliams

02-04-02, 12:55 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail AnnWilliams Click to send private message to AnnWilliams Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
10. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #9
 
   Tamara Karsavina's 'Theatre Street' is the absolute pearl of my collection. It is probably still available through Dance Books (David?).

'Theatre Street' covers the emergence of Russian ballet at the beginning of the 20th century as well Karsavina's time with Diaghilev and her career in England. What is fascinating about the book is that not only does it contain much valuable ballet history, but it is also beautifully written. She was obviously a woman of considerable intellect as well as a remarkable dancer.

Also, try to find Anton Dolin's memoirs - he wrote more than one, I think. As he knew virtually everyone in ballet, including Diaghhilev and Balanchine, and as he was a prodigious name-dropper and gossip, the books are enormous fun. I'll look my copies out and provide titles and details later.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

05-04-02, 01:26 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
32. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #10
 
   >'Theatre Street' covers the emergence of
>Russian ballet at the beginning
>of the 20th century as
>well Karsavina's time with Diaghilev
>and her career in England.
>What is fascinating about the
>book is that not only
>does it contain much valuable
>ballet history, but it is
>also beautifully written. She
>was obviously a woman of
>considerable intellect as well as
>a remarkable dancer.

So true. Definitely another one to treasure.

Did I miss it, or has nobody mentioned Buckle at the Ballet?

Agree about recommending the Greskovic - I think it appears in 2 editions under different titles, a hardback at £30 (should have contained some photos at that price, I feel), and a paperback at less than half that. Have a feeling that one's the US version and one's adapted to the UK.

Like Viviane, I've still got a whole load of weighty ballet books hanging round just waiting for a summer holiday so I can read them! (Still haven't got through everything I picked up when Dance Books closed)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

02-04-02, 01:30 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
12. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #8
 
   Viviane - I was rereading parts of both yesterday, Kavanagh draws much from Vaughan. Hers is the more interesting altogether and an easy read, won't take long to read. Somebody reviewed the Vaughan book along the lines of "with friends like these who needs enemies". He certainly almost wilfully misrepresents the ballets - though the photographs are evocative.

Alastair Macaulay is I think writing a new Ashton book focusing on the choreography - does anybody know when this is due to be published?

More generally, agree about Kirkland's Dancing on my Grave. Buckle's Diaghilev is very good as is Drummond's Letters (or Conversations??) about Diaghilev.

John Percival's book about Cranko is interesting - he was the sort of artistic director who did not have an office or desk. All that routine got done in his wake leaving him to be genuinely creative.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

02-04-02, 02:10 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
13. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #12
 
   Paul,

I had never heard that Vaughan's book was controversial in the way you suggest. Why did his critics say he misrepresented the Ashton ballets?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

02-04-02, 02:44 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
15. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #13
 
   Brendan, controversial is too strong. I'm dredging the memory here but when I re-read this a couple of years ago I did recall the dissatisfaction on reading it originally in the mid-80s: there is so much more to Ashton's works than you get from the Vaughan descriptions/ judgements. Can't recall specifics - but there's enough about practically every ballet or production to say "that's not my experience, there's more to it than that". This was picked up on by some critics - John Percival I think.

I've got a feeling that Macaulay's book to come is derived from his dissatsfaction with both this and the Kavanagh.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

02-04-02, 04:30 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
17. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #12
 
   >...and an easy read, won't take long to read.
Thank you Paul, for hearten me !
Both, you and Brendan, are introducing here a difficult topic :
how strong is the reliability of those books ? Histories have been re-written and re-thought over and over again, sometimes one is reading totally controversial stories...

Some other titles :
'Balletmaster' A dancer's view of George Balanchine by Moira Shearer.(86)
'Dansen' by Valery Panov & George Feifer (86) (sorry don't know the exact English title) For those who have interest in Russian dance...and politics... impossible to unravel in those days.
Although a hard book, much easier to read than Plisetskaya.
'Markova, her life and art' by Anton Dolin : I have read it in one go

And my dancing teenager loved : "An unconventional Life' by Joan Brady. A biography of a dancer with all her emotional problems, one day, promising with NYCB, the other day quit dancing.
All about the struggle to come back.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

02-04-02, 04:47 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
18. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #17
 
   >how strong is the reliability of
>those books ? Histories have
>been re-written and re-thought

Viviane - re the Kavanagh, to she makes a convincing case of interpreting the ballets through the relationships that Ashton was in at the time - ie how the loves of his life influenced his works/ subject matter. She is good on how casting was arrived at too in this way.

I make it sound more prurient than it is, though some of this book is very candid (his advice to Ferri about Baryshnikov is very to the point) though a friend whose dance going happened during the 40s and 50s thought that Kavanagh didn't really like Ashton as a subject.

I would say it's a reliable book, lots of sources quoted though some anonymously. Fascinating too to look at the photos of Ashton in the swimmiming pool with Princess Margaret and family, others (not in the pool!) with HMQM.

She's good a capturing the desolation of his later years.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

02-04-02, 09:45 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
19. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #18
 
   I hardly can wait until holiday to start reading now ! So far I only looked at the pictures
Has someone read Buckle's "Nijinski" ? (I'm using it as a paperweight at the moment !)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

03-04-02, 08:33 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
20. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #19
 
   Yes - some common ground with Buckle's Diaghilev but very good.

Bronislava Nijinskas's Early Memoirs is a must (that's a big paperweight but fascinating).


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

03-04-02, 08:38 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
22. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #20
 
   >Bronislava Nijinskas's Early Memoirs is a must (that's a big paperweight but fascinating).

I have a new 'book-list'


  Printer-friendly page | Top
David L

07-04-02, 11:48 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail David%20L Click to send private message to David%20L Click to add this user to your buddy list  
35. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #12
 
   >Somebody reviewed
>the Vaughan book along the
>lines of "with friends like
>these who needs enemies". He
>certainly almost wilfully misrepresents the
>ballets - though the photographs
>are evocative.
>

I'm amazed at this comment: David Vaughan is one of Ashton's greatest admirers. What on earth makes you think that he "wilfully misrepresents the ballets"? Can you give some examples?

(And, yes, OK, I have an axe to grind: I'm the book's publisher.)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
AEHandley

02-04-02, 01:13 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail AEHandley Click to send private message to AEHandley Click to add this user to your buddy list  
11. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #4
 
   >I enjoyed "Once a dancer" by
>Allegra Kent and "Dancing on
>my grave" by Gelsey Kirkland.

Oh yes, I'd forgotten about Dancing on my Grave. I think this book has a lot to do with why I don't like Baryshnikov's dancing! And yes, it was the Solway book I'd just read.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Helen

02-04-02, 02:11 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Helen Click to send private message to Helen Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
14. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #11
 
   Absolutely agree about Theatre Street - a favourite book all my life. I had a very old just-post-war edition, and a friend recently gave me a much more recent (1981) Dance Books edition for my birthday - many more wonderful pictures. It cost £2.50 second hand - she told me - and was probably my favourite present! I always loved the bit about Tamara's paper doll Amelia, made by herself when a little girl, who lived "a turbulent life owing to her beauty"! When I went to St Petersburg, so many places were familiar to me from this book.

Keith Money's "Fonteyn, the making of a legend" is a wonderful picture book, but I think no longer in print.

Any biography is worth reading; somehow I missed the Seymour one when it first came out, couldn't find it second hand, but found it through the library eventually. Very interesting.

And as I keep saying to anyone who will listen, WHEN is a full-length, big biography of Fonteyn going to appear? Surely it's time?

The children's "career novels", as typified by first Ballet Shoes, then Lorna Hill's Veronica books, and then the Drina series of Jean Estoril, don't seem to exist any more. I think children are more realistic nowadays.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

02-04-02, 04:18 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
16. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #14
 
   LAST EDITED ON 02-04-02 AT 04:19 PM (GMT)

Hmmm. Some of them are! Jean Estoril actually had another series, the 'Ballet Family' series, under the name of Mabel Esther Allen. The 'Drina' books *are* very unrealistic, but the children's ballet series of the late 90s are even more so - I reccommend neither Mal Lewis Jones nor Harriet Castor, although I *do* recommend Jean Ure.

'Ballet Shoes' is actually the first in a sort-of-series - 'Curtain Up', 'A Painted Garden' and 'Apple Bough' all follow on from this 1936 book. Another of Streatfield's dancing books was 'Dancing Shoes' (this was previously called something like 'Wintle's Wonders' - the Americans decided to change all the titles: 'Curtain Up' became Theatre Shoes, 'Painted Garden' became 'Film Shoes', and so on.) However Streatfield never had ballet lessons herself so they are not particularly accurate (she was lured to ballet when she saw Dame Ninette de Valois dancing on a pier. One of her books is dedicated to Dame Ninette.)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

03-04-02, 11:47 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
21. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #16
 
   Excuse yesterday's ramblings. I am supposed to be doing revision for exams, which explains my multiple, useless comments on almost every topic in existance!

How about 'Come Dance With Me' by Ninette de Valois? A very easy read, but fascinating. Perhaps to be read with the Sorley-Walker biography?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

03-04-02, 08:40 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
23. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   My very, very last book-purchase was "Ballet 101" by Robert Greskovic (98). (A complete guide to learning and loving the ballet).
I absolutely wanted to read something about 'insight' on ballet and especially about "Giselle"...I have still a lot to learn
The "Giselle"-chapter is great. The book has an interesting videography and an extensive bibliography, an easy to read 'history of ballet', a chapter on 'dancers', 'looking at ballet', "the famous ballets" : a complete analysis of 16 ballets- referring -in detail- to the available video-recordings. And a glossary of ballet terms and phrases make it all complete.
I simply take it with me all the time and read bits and pieces everywhere.
So, if you see someone engrossed in 'Ballet 101'...


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Helen

03-04-02, 09:17 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Helen Click to send private message to Helen Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
24. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #23
 
   >So, if you see someone engrossed
>in 'Ballet 101'...

It could be me. Very useful book for everybody.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

04-04-02, 09:28 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
25. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #24
 
   Personally, I'm afraid, don't like these books that offer dissections of ballets - there is no replecement for actually watching the ballet oneself; one ends up overloaded with nuances that one is meant to notice, and therefore cannot notice any oneself.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

04-04-02, 11:17 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
26. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #25
 
   This is NOT about cool dissections.
It's marvelous to discover subtleties-even after seeing a ballet numerous times ! And to be able to compare different choreographies on the same theme.
And it's absolutely not a book 'after I've read this, I know it all'...


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

04-04-02, 11:21 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
27. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #26
 
   Sorry, but I couldn't finish it.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Helen

04-04-02, 11:56 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Helen Click to send private message to Helen Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
28. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #27
 
   I don't think it's the kind of book you're supposed to finish - more for dipping into.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
sylvia

04-04-02, 12:30 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail sylvia Click to send private message to sylvia Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
29. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #28
 
   I liked The Shape of Love, sort of. It can be a little tedious with the detail Glesey Kirkland goes into but I like the insights she has about R&J, Giselle and Sleeping Beauty. It's also about her year in London with the RB so there are some funny asides about Anthony Dowell and company. Her first book was really good as well but so depressing. And I definitely recommend Lynn Seymour and Antoinette Sibley's autobiographies. They're both in Southampton Central Library if anyone is close enough.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Ann Welsh

04-04-02, 05:54 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Ann%20Welsh Click to send private message to Ann%20Welsh Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
30. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   If you want to top up your collections of Lorna Hill/Noel Streatfields there are some listed for auction on Ebay .


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Robert

05-04-02, 05:12 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Robert Click to send private message to Robert Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
33. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #30
 
   First you must decide what sort of dance books you want. Like many people on Balletco I thought the Cavanagh Ashton book fascinating. I remembered a lot of the dancers and was intrigued by her portrayal and gossip about the whole ballet scene.
In 1979 there was a sale of about 800 dance books at Sotherbys, The Jack Cole collection, I have the catalogue and there were books listed there of enormous interest and importance, but they would be valuable to some and boring to others.
I find the web the best place to buy dance books, although I did well in a second hand shop the other day. My sister in law is very keen on Ballanchine (poor thing) and asks me to look on the web for her. We have bought several really good and difficult to find books through abebooks.com Most have come from America, they are often cheaper there, and the dealers are both friendly and helpful. If you do not know what you are looking for a shop is obviously best, but Dance books is no longer a shop. I sometime go to Blackwell’s second hand in Oxford. I recently bought Stepping Left, Dance and Politics in New York 1928-1942(not an April fool joke) it is actually very interesting.
From my youth I remember the books on Kurt Joos and the book by Lifar as being interesting. Someone mentioned Anton Dolin’s book I was amazed to read that his background was in hunting.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

05-04-02, 07:08 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
34. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #33
 
   It is true that the Robert Greskovic book isn't one for reading straight throu, but if you borrow it from the library you don't have much choice. At my local libaray, all adult dance books (and there aren't many) are reference only.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan S

08-04-02, 02:18 AM (GMT)
Click to add this user to your buddy list  
36. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #34
 
   I'm always surprised that more people don't make use of the RAD library. It's probably the best collection of dance books in London...


  Printer-friendly page | Top
David L

08-04-02, 07:47 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail David%20L Click to send private message to David%20L Click to add this user to your buddy list  
37. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #36
 
   >I'm always surprised that more people
>don't make use of the
>RAD library. It's probably the
>best collection of dance books
>in London...

Perhaps you could post a few more details, Jonathan?

Is it open to the general public, hours of opening, do you need to make an appointment, etc?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan S

16-04-02, 08:25 AM (GMT)
Click to add this user to your buddy list  
53. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #37
 
   Here's a direct link to the pages about the RAD library:

http://www.rad.org.uk/library/library.html

If you come through the main site, you need to click on "Services" on the left hand side, then scroll down to "Philip Richardson Library" and follow the link.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

10-04-02, 06:24 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
42. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #36
 
   There's also the Anna Pavlova memorial library in Westminster REference Library (I can't remember the road name, but it's the little one that goes immediately south off Leicester Square). I don't know whether the books are for borrowing, though. It also keeps most of the dance magazines as well.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Justin

08-04-02, 10:00 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Justin Click to send private message to Justin Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
38. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   Personally, I like "Striking a balance: dancers talk about dancing" by Barbara Newman, Elm Tree Books, London 1982. I think its out of print, but I did get a copty through arts books.

It consists of interviews with dancers done in the late 70's - ranging from Felia Doubrovska through Moira Shearer to David Wall and Merrill Ashley. The interviews tend to focus around dancers explaining their interpretation of certain roles - I've just been reading Alcia Alonso on her take on Giselle. There's little on English dancers, though.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Robert

08-04-02, 03:10 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Robert Click to send private message to Robert Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
39. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #38
 
   What fun
I have just bought a couple more interesting dance books at the Quay in Exeter. One was the first Ballet Annual with lots of interesting articles about Fonteyn Shearer and Ashton. Super photographs and a really lovely cover. I think browsing is your best bet.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

09-04-02, 10:40 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
40. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #39
 
   They have an RAD library? Yes, more details please! (I live in County Durham anyway, but still)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

10-04-02, 06:22 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
41. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #38
 
   Yes, that was fascinating in parts, although I never managed to read the updated version.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Pete

11-04-02, 01:09 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Pete Click to send private message to Pete Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
43. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #41
 
   LAST EDITED ON 11-04-02 AT 01:13 AM (GMT)

Favourite reads are Quicksilver, the autobiography of Marie Rambert, Markova: The Legend by Maurice Leonard, Reminiscences of the Russian Ballet by Alexanre Benois, Through The Red Curtain and Through the Bamboo Curtain by Beryl Grey. All compelling insights for those of us less experienced in ballet and the way things were for dancers in the recent past -truly fascinating. As Robert mentioned, the Advanced Book Exchange is a great resource for buying books.

I am dying to read Anna Pavlova by Victor Dandre but it's such a fine copy I'm afraid of touching it! (reading a book wearing white cotton gloves on the train would be weird, although it would guarantee me a seat!)

And as for the RAD library (the prospect of which had me salivating -which is not good for books), unfortunately it seems access is restricted by payment or otherwise.

RAD Library Access


  Printer-friendly page | Top
katharine kanter

11-04-02, 10:06 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail katharine%20kanter Click to send private message to katharine%20kanter Click to add this user to your buddy list  
44. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #43
 
   About twenty years ago, someone lent me a copy of Baron Dandre's book on Anna Pavlova, with whom he lived for three or so decades. I recall that it begins with something like the words:

"My wife was a person of true spiritual beauty".


It is a most worthwhile read. What struck me at the time, is the extent to which Anna Pavlova changed the world. In virtually every country she travelled to, she went to see the authorities, and argued for the establishment of free conservatories where children of all social classes could study classical dance for free. She was truly a missionary of the ballet. It is thanks to the influence of Anna Pavlova, that countries like Argentina, Brazil, or Mexico have brought out so many classical dancers.

In India, however, she advised the Indian classical dancers she met with there, NOT to abandon their own traditional schools. She said this would be a ghastly mistake, and that they should rather concentrate on a deep study of those schools. Time has, of course, proven her right, because Indian classical dance is, of course, the origin of our own Western system (the turn-out, the use of the eyes, the mime gestures...).

The other, very polemical issue, raised by Baron Dandré, is Anna Pavlova's unmitigated contempt for Diaghilev and what the latter stood for. A deeper discussion of this would take us very far afield here, but one should bear in mind that Pavlova, no matter how difficult she may have been as a person, was nevertheless an absolute classicist. She continued to study with Cecchetti at his own studios throughout her career, and completely rejected Diaghilev's notion of blurring the dance into a Wagnerian orgy of "total theatre".

Allow me to add here, that it would be wrong to dismiss Pavlova's dancing as "outdated", simply because the film footage of her is of appalling quality. Still photography no doubt gives a better idea of the unbelievable precision of her ports de bras, the exquisite use of épaulement, her feet that were like Lyn Seymour's - they were hands. I have seen the only footage of Spessivtseva in existence, a few seconds of "Giselle" filmed just before her final breakdown. Technically, she was a great master, tremendous attack ! As Pavlova came from the same school, with the exact same training, and even allowing for her notoriously weaker technique, I would tend to doubt that the technical gap between her and Spessivsteva could have yawned all that deep.

As Cecchetti was known as a great and demanding technician, I would also tend to doubt that he might have wasted his valuable time on a dilettantish buffoon.



  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

11-04-02, 01:36 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
45. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #43
 
   Interesting that you should mention "Markova: The Legend", because I've found that an extremely annoying book to read (so much so that I haven't actually finished it yet). I got the feeling that Markova was far too much in control of things - every time the author got onto an interesting line of thought, he seems to have got stopped. And I found there was an awful lot of trivial stuff that I would have edited out.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

14-04-02, 05:08 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
46. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #45
 
   At present I'm reading 'precious little Sleep', by Wayne Sleep. I found a new hardback copy in a second-hand bookshop yesterday. It is very intersting and informative, but rather annoying as it is not very well written. I wish he'd just asked someone else to write one for him.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

15-04-02, 01:38 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
47. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #46
 
   I enjoyed it, but found the constant first-name-dropping got a bit confusing.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Helen

15-04-02, 02:23 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Helen Click to send private message to Helen Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
48. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #47
 
   I seem to have missed the Wayne Sleep one - must try to find it.

I agree with Alison about the Markova book - very irritating. The personality that comes across is rather smug and self-satisfied. I've always hoped that this was the fault of the writer, not the dancer herself.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Helen

15-04-02, 02:30 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Helen Click to send private message to Helen Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
49. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #47
 
   I seem to have missed the Wayne Sleep one - must try to find it.

I agree with Alison about the Markova book - very irritating. The personality that comes across is rather smug and self-satisfied. I've always hoped that this was the fault of the writer, not the dancer herself.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Flight

15-04-02, 09:50 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Flight Click to send private message to Flight Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
50. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #49
 
   LAST EDITED ON 15-04-02 AT 10:18 PM (GMT)

It appears that Debbie Bull has written a pocket guide to ballet - might be interesting.

Has anyone read Nureyev's autobiography? Is it worth me buying it?

BTW, last time I was in Covent Garden's Banana Bookshop (the afternoon of the Rojo/Corella Giselle matine - I don't go by dates, I go by trips to the theatre) there were still a few copies of 'The House' by Kae Mosse, for only two pounds each. They've been there at least since I bought mine (for five pounds, on the afternoon of the Benjamin/Kobborg Swan lake mat., sometime in late 2000). Lovely pictures.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Tomoko.A

15-04-02, 10:56 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Tomoko.A Click to send private message to Tomoko.A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
51. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #50
 
   Flight, where is Banana Bookshop exactly ?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
sylvia

16-04-02, 06:12 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail sylvia Click to send private message to sylvia Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
52. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #51
 
   Tomoko I think it's in that undercover area in the centre of the Piazza, where all the shops and foodstalls are. Painted in yellow if I remember. I didn't realise they still had copies. I got one last year for 4.99 and I agree it's a fun read (Adam Coopers promotion to principal is really sweet) and some of the photos are really nice.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
MAB

16-04-02, 10:37 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail MAB Click to send private message to MAB Click to add this user to your buddy list  
54. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #50
 
   Flight, Nureyev's autobiography is definitely worth reading. He was 23 when he wrote it, so it is mainly an account of his early years in Russia, his defection and his first impressions of the west. Later biographers have cast some doubt over the hardships he claims to have experienced during his childhood though. Read it in conjunction with the Diane Solway book, which is very well researched.

The problem with books about Nureyev and indeed with most biographies of dancers is that the authors have little or no knowledge of ballet and have to rely upon what the critics wrote at the time. For an accurate idea of what he was like on stage, try and read "the Nureyev Image" by Alexander Bland, It is mostly a picture book but the authors (Nigel Gosling & Maud Lloyd) give a vibrant impression of the impact of his dancing.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

16-04-02, 10:48 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
55. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #54
 
   Julie Kavanagh, who wrote "Secret Muses: The Life of Frederick Ashton", is working on a new biography of Nureyev. As she is a dancer by background, her book ought to make good many of the deficits that MAB described in the earlier biographies. I have no idea when it is likely to be published; it may be some way off.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Shantrice

19-04-02, 06:47 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Shantrice Click to send private message to Shantrice Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
56. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #55
 
   My most recommended and also my favourite ballet books are as follow.

"FREDERICK ASHTON AND HIS BALLETS" BY DAVID VAUGHAN
As its title stated, this book is best to understand his ballets in depth. If you are a fan of Ashton ballets, this book is ready to make you enjoy.

"ANTOINETTE SIBLEY" BY LESLIE E. SPATT
Has more photographs than text but the collection of lavish onstage photos of Sibley reveals how lovely she was as one of the legendary ballerinas in the history of Royal Ballet. Her regular partner, Anthony Dowell is also well captured together with Sibley in most of the photos. This book shows not only Sibley's beauty but it is also eloquent enough to prove the harmonic partnership of Sibley and Dowell.

"NIJINSKY DANCING" BY LINCOLN KIRSTEIN
Big sized book with a full of historic photographs and text filled with interesting information. This book allures the reader into the mysterious world of art created by unparalleled genius, Nijinsky.

It's sad that most of the books I long to read are usually unavailable (out of print) only because they are published long time ago. I wonder if anybody read the book, "Sibley and Dowell" by Nicholas Dromgoole and Leslie E. Spatt.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

22-04-02, 01:43 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
57. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #56
 
   I'm now reading Norman Lebrecht's history of Covent Garden - fsacinating. he's the former arts correspondent of the DT now arts editor of the Standard. Very waspish, opinionated, not always accurate but well informed and interesting. He hasn't a good word for anybody (Tooley and Isaacs regimes come out at a love-all draw). Insights into th epressures on Dowell during his tenure.

He's got some questionable observations about MacMillan and is actually less good on the redevelopment years than Isaacs in his own memoires but, having started with the second half of the book, I'm now at the beginning. How the companies were reestablished in 1946 and the theatre reopened is very interesting. The insights into the characters of Maynard Keynes and David Webster are very good.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

22-04-02, 02:35 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
58. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #57
 
   Great to hear about 'I'm now reading...'
Bruce, is it possible to create a PERMANENT 'ballet book'-thread?
This one is too valuable to be closed one time !

Btw, I started Gelsey Kirkland's "The shape of Love" (about her return to the London stage).... I know, I have to read "Dancing on My Grave" before ! But, for some reason I can't start that book ...


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Tomoko.A

22-04-02, 11:03 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Tomoko.A Click to send private message to Tomoko.A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
59. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #58
 
   Viviane, could you please give me more details of the Gelsey Kirkland's "The shape of Love". I've never heard of this book before. Is it out of print ? Where can I find a copy ?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

23-04-02, 08:32 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
60. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #59
 
   LAST EDITED ON 23-04-02 AT 09:03 AM (GMT)

Tomoko, mine is the 'Penguin' edition ISBN 014 O1.4430 7 published in 1992.
The first publishing was by Doubleday in USA, 1990.
Written by Gelsley Kirkland and Greg Lawrence, in Memory of Antony Tudor and Frederick Ashton.
There are lots of pictures in it with Anthony Dowell in R&J and full with familiar names to the London-scene.
She litteraly takes you with her into the R&J-rehearsals and performances...oh...I'm enjoying it !
I have no clue if it's still available, I've found my secondhand-copy last week in 'The English bookshop' in Gent
If you can't find it, I'll bring it with me on my next visit


  Printer-friendly page | Top
sylvia

23-04-02, 11:23 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail sylvia Click to send private message to sylvia Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
62. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #59
 
   Tomoko, The Shape of Love is in Southampton Central Library.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
alison

23-04-02, 01:22 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail alison Click to send private message to alison Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
63. "Libraries"
In response to message #62
 
   I was going to point out that frequently a lot of these books which are unavailable commercially may still be available through a local, good-sized library (or try inter-library loans). I know that a lot of the books mentioned here are ones I recognise from my own local libraries. My experience is generally that they don't tend to chuck out old books because there are so few new ones coming in to replace them.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Viviane

23-04-02, 01:48 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Viviane Click to send private message to Viviane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
64. "RE: Libraries"
In response to message #63
 
   >My experience is generally that they don't tend to chuck out >old books because there are so few new ones coming in to >replace them.

Do you really think so ? Overhere books stay in the library as long as they are in demand ! If not they disappear after a couple of years and end-up in the annual library-sale...a feast...at 10p/book


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruceadmin

23-04-02, 07:50 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce Click to send private message to Bruce Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
67. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #58
 
   >Great to hear about 'I'm now
>reading...'
>Bruce, is it possible to create
>a PERMANENT 'ballet book'-thread?
>This one is too valuable to
>be closed one time !

Well we don't generally delete posts though they do go into archive at some point and sadly some of the older archive material is not on line - but that's a current technical restriction rather than a matter of policy.

So this thread will be here for some considerable time. The problem though is that people don't generally look back or search postings or the site to see what has gone and been said before.

We do though need to have new book threads start because this one is now well over 220k long and a hell of a download. But we often link threads together when that happens of course.

Perhaps we could have a special page of links to very popular threads. But its another thing to look after, tend and maintain and we have many of those already!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Robert

23-04-02, 03:46 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Robert Click to send private message to Robert Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
65. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #57
 
   Paul A
Lebrecht’s book on Covent Garden is very interesting and at times dramatic, although he is not too sure about the Ballet. Try to get a copy of ‘Artist Unknown, An Alternative History of the Arts Council’ by Richard Witts.1998. I think Lebrecht and all the other Covent Garden commentators raided it ‘Artist Unknown’ is very irreverent and very funny! How anyone can make the history of the Arts Council funny beats me but he does. He makes sweeping statements, which I do not always agree with (De Valious a banal choreographer!) but it is difficult to put down. His account of Keynes and his desire to make a gift of a permanent ballet theatre to Lydia Lopokova, and his hatred of John Christie at Glyndebourne, is fascinating. Some people allege that Opera at Covent Garden was only an afterthought to keep Christie out!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Paul A

23-04-02, 04:20 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Paul%20A Click to send private message to Paul%20A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
66. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #65
 
   ‘Artist Unknown, An Alternative
>History of the Arts Council’
>by Richard Witts.1998.

Thanks for the recommendation Robert.

How anyone
>can make the history of
>the Arts Council funny beats
>me but he does.

Oh I don't know!?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Justin

23-04-02, 10:36 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Justin Click to send private message to Justin Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
61. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   Can I put a word in for the excellent Surrey Perorming Arts Library? Membership is available to anyone who lives or works in Surrey, and there are plenty of ballet book and videos, and on other aspects of performing arts. They have a website (http://www.sympa.org.uk/spal.html) and their catalogue is available on-line.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruceadmin

23-04-02, 07:56 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce Click to send private message to Bruce Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
68. "NEW THREAD STARTED"
In response to message #0
 
  
Time to start a new thread - this is just so massive now! The new thread is at:
http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2658.html

Thank you and do keep adding your thoughts. Bruce


  Printer-friendly page | Top
balletbabe

29-04-02, 10:28 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail balletbabe Click to send private message to balletbabe Click to add this user to your buddy list  
69. "RE: best ballet books"
In response to message #0
 
   I love darcey bussell's biography, life in dance, its really good!!! Good for all ages!


  Printer-friendly page | Top

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic

 
Questions or problems regarding this bulletin board should be directed to Bruce Marriott