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Subject: "Latest Review Links - wb 25 March 2002" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Conferences What's Happening Topic #2584
Reading Topic #2584
Bruceadmin

25-03-02, 07:58 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce Click to send private message to Bruce Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
"Latest Review Links - wb 25 March 2002"
 
   Each day we add the latest links to reviews and interviews that we find on the major newspaper web sites around the world. If you find a link that we have missed do please post it up, preferably as a URL link.

Last weeks thread:
http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2571.html

Bookmarking this page:
Click on the following link and then bookmark the links page that comes back - it's a special URL that will always bring you to the thread with the latest reviews:
http://www.ballet.co.uk/todayslinks

We should not need to state this but these links are for our readers use and not for other websites to take and pass off as their own. We ask all visitors to respect Ballet.co's site and the way it operates.


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  Monday Links - 25 March 2002 Bruceadmin 25-03-02 1
  Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002 Bruceadmin 26-03-02 2
     RE: Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002 (2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 26-03-02 4
         RE: Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002 (3) Brendan McCarthymoderator 26-03-02 5
             RE: Wednesday links, 27th March AnnWilliams 27-03-02 7
                 RE: Wednesday links, 27th March (2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 27-03-02 9
                     RE: Thursday links - 28th March AnnWilliams 28-03-02 10
                         RE: Thursday links - 28th March alison 28-03-02 11
                             RE: Friday links 29th March AnnWilliams 29-03-02 12
                             Hampson again... Bruceadmin 29-03-02 13
                             RE: Friday links - 29th March (2) AnnWilliams 29-03-02 14
                             RE: Saturday 30th Brendan McCarthymoderator 30-03-02 15
                             RE: Saturday 30th (2) Brendan McCarthymoderator 30-03-02 16
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) Brendan McCarthymoderator 30-03-02 17
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) PhilipBadmin 30-03-02 18
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) Brendan McCarthymoderator 30-03-02 19
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) AEHandley 30-03-02 20
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) Carly Gillies 30-03-02 21
                             RE: Gaynor Minden Viviane 30-03-02 22
                             RE: Gaynor Mindens Brendan McCarthymoderator 30-03-02 23
                             RE: Saturday 30th (3) Bruceadmin 31-03-02 24
                             RE: Sunday 31st Brendan McCarthymoderator 31-03-02 25
                             RE: Sunday 31st - correction Brendan McCarthymoderator 31-03-02 26
                             RE: Sunday 31st AnnWilliams 31-03-02 27
                             RE: Hampson again... alison 03-04-02 28

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Bruceadmin

25-03-02, 08:00 AM (GMT)
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1. "Monday Links - 25 March 2002"
In response to message #0
 
  
Royal Ballet
Giselle - Alina Cojocaru
A heroine of touching clarity
Financial Times; Mar 25, 2002
By CLEMENT CRISP
"The Romanian Cojocaru is still young - in her early 20s - and exceptionally gifted. Her physique is slight, delicately boned, lovely in proportion. She is musically sensitive. A supple back, fine-drawn line, a suggestion of tungsten-strength, all indicate a worthy ballerina candidate. Her youth makes her seem vulnerable, but her Olga in Onegin proved there is emotional power and an enchanting caprice in her temperament: I have never seen the role better danced. She has some of the faults of inexperience - she cannot resist extravagant extensions (a vulgarity unsuited to the older repertory); her feet are not always as pretty as they should be, thanks in part to dreary shoes; she does not yet have great authority - but her talent is clear, her distinction is unassuming and lovely. As Nikiya she plays and dances with a beautiful innocence: every emotion, from revulsion at the High Brahmin's lust to fierce anger with Gamzatti and entire devotion to Solor, is expressed in movement of touching clarity. As the Shade, she accepts all the challenges of the choreography with a gentle but unshaken grace. I thought her performance of great present merit and even rarer grandeur to come."
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020325001326

Royal Ballet
Giselle
Royal Opera House, London
by Judith Mackrell
"Although Saturday's performance (Benjamin, Stiefel) overall was good rather than great, it did illuminate some interesting details in the ballet, particularly in the smaller roles. Jenny Tattersall's Moyna was wonderfully spiky and vaporous; Alastair Marriott's Hilarion was almost hatefully sincere (a nice contrast to his hilariously queeny Master of the Hunt on Thursday), and Ashley Page was a wickedly bluff, lascivious Duke. This is the kind of stage business that the Royal does better than any other company"
http://www.guardian.co.uk/reviews/story/0,3604,673449,00.html

New York City Ballet
One giant leap for America
The New York City Ballet has triumphed this season, with six world premieres announced for spring. Nadine Meisner applauds its innovative director, who stepped so gracefully in Balanchine's shoes
The Independent - United Kingdom; Mar 25, 2002 but not on their website - this link via the FT
BY NADINE MEISNER
"Martins has been reviled and admired in equal measure. You can criticise some of his changes, but you can't deny that he has done his utmost to stir choreographic creativity and stretch his dancers with a cornucopia of ballets: 49 for the 2001-2 season, including six world premieres and four New York premieres. No other company has such a large, effervescent repertoire. (The Royal Ballet has less than half the number for the same period.) Nor - as befits a country where coffee comes served 20 different ways - such luxuriously flexible programming, able to offer as a matter of course the same ballets in pick'n'mix combinations.
    "The six world premieres, announced for spring, belong to the company's Diamond Project, a biennial festival started 10 years ago to encourage new work by choreographers from inside (eg the principal dancer, Albert Evans) and outside (eg the Australian Stephen Baynes). Last year's NYCB visit to the Edinburgh Festival focused on pieces produced by past Diamond Projects and, similarly, this spring's showcase on home ground will include a retrospective of 15 previous commissions to celebrate the 10th anniversary. But even without this, in a normal February week when I was there, the quantity of recent work was remarkable."
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020325000996

Richard Alston
by Debra Craine
Richard Alston Dance Co
London, Queen Elizabeth Hall
"Touch and Go was the newest work on the programme, made earlier this year and here receiving its London premiere. Inspired by Astor Piazzolla’s tango meets jazz music (adapted and softened by the Italian accordionist Roberto Daris), it explores the art of the duet, steering clear of the sweaty male-female clichés usually espoused by tango. Alston’s fluid writing plays with nimble sensual connections but never lingers on overt erotic desire. It’s pleasant and smoothly performed, but too soft focus to be memorable."
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,685-247127,00.html

Hesse State Theater Ballet
Cinderella
Someday, Your Prince Will Come
And God created the stepmother: Cinderella and family. (Photo: Antonin Michna)
WIESBADEN
By Gerald Siegmund
"Belgian choreographer Stijn Celis won acclaim for his "Quartett," an extremely difficult piece for four couples, for the Mainz Ballet. When he was asked to choreograph "Cinderella" for the ballet of the Hesse State Theater, people may have hoped that he would achieve something similar on the opposite bank of the Rhine in Wiesbaden -- but those hopes have only been marginally fulfilled.
    "Still, in a place where dreamlike new productions of works ranging from "Giselle" to "Swan Lake" alternate with the pompous fantasies of ballet director Ben van Cauwenbergh, the result should certainly be seen as a leap forward in quality. Celis, who was also responsible for the surreal-looking set consisting of inaccessibly high walls and oversized doors, has brought the old Cinderella fairy tale thoroughly up to date and invested it with a meaning sometimes reminiscent of Mats Ek's depth psychology in his reinterpretations of the classics. Yet at the premiere on March 16, Celis' characterization lacked precision, and the Wiesbaden dancers lacked expressiveness, which made everything ultimately lose its way."
Frankfurter Allgemeine link

Cullberg Ballet
To baldly go where no swan has been
Swan Lake
Burswood Theatre, Perth.
By Rita Clark
"There's really nothing left of the traditional Swan Lake. The four cygnets become three ducks and – to Tchaikovsky's famous score – waddle about, in direct contrast to the traditional, dainty, pas de quatre. That their pas de trois seems so apt is one of the shocks and sources of humour this production gives you.
    "Much of the dance language is distinctively cartoonish. Siegfried dances with his arms drooping like Leunig's little man. Gestures generally are often grotesque, but the spectacle is astonishingly beautiful.
    "Oh, yes, all the dancers except Siegfried are bald, giving them the appearance of shop mannequins. Often they're also shoeless and some of the swans in tutus are male. (It has been official for some time that swans are no longer female. The New York Trocks appeared in Melbourne last year doing their all-male version of various swan ballets.)"
http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,4012107%255E16953,00.html

Everett Dance Theatre
A Secondary Look At the Racial Divide
Washington
by Lisa Traiger
"Everett Dance Theatre produced an evening filled with good intentions Friday night; unfortunately, its work was mostly artless. The Providence, R.I.-based troupe, directed by Dorothy and Aaron Jungels, brought its hour-long work "Somewhere in the Dream" to Dance Place to explore issues across the racial divide, as played out in an urban high school.
    "But when the 10 performers took to the stage, their rough-and-tumble demeanor seemed amateurish rather than street-smart. "Somewhere" was made more real by movable chain-link fences on stage.
    "A surprising three years in the making, the piece culled its text from interviews with high school students, teachers, school administrators and education policymakers. The coarsely executed movement borrowed liberally from the street -- b-boying, flipping, breaking and house dancing. A smattering of low-level ballet, jazz and fraternity-like stepping (the troupe claims it is tap) was haphazardly tossed into the mix."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A12362-2002Mar24.html

Nancy Meehan Dance Company
Painterly Images Color Leotards and Poses
New York
By ANNA KISSELGOFF
"A sense of purity pervades the plotless dance pieces of Nancy Meehan, who retains her originality amid the clutter of passing trends. Movement that is clear and straightforward frees her choreography from psychological obstacles. Drama takes the form of unpredictable occurrences caused by shifts in space and rhythm.
    "Nature imagery is often Ms. Meehan's springboard, but the two works performed on Friday night by the Nancy Meehan Dance Company at St. Mark's Church had a striking painterly impact. Like the stripes on the beautiful leotards that Anthony Candido designed for the six female dancers, rivulets of colorful movement seemed to flow out of the often propulsive dancing. The patterns were fluid rather than geometric, the idiom was rooted in parallel leg positions and the dancers had a natural look, echoed in their audible rhythmic breathing."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/25/arts/dance/25MEEH.html


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Bruceadmin

26-03-02, 07:42 AM (GMT)
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2. "Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002"
In response to message #0
 
  
Northern Ballet Theatre
Madame Butterfly
Artist: Northern Ballet Theatre
Venue: Sadler's Wells Theatre, London
by RUPERT CHRISTIANSEN, Mail on Sunday
"Following a sorry series of squibs and stinkers, Northern Ballet Theatre has returned to form with a palpable hit.
    "Its new artistic director, David Nixon, has choreographed a version of Puccini's opera Madama Butterfly which tells the familiar story with clarity and sensitivity.
    "...Enhanced by Ali Allen's simple yet attractive designs, this production is clearly a winner."
http://www.femail.co.uk/pages/standard/article.html?in_article_id=104402&in_page_id=533

Edinburgh Festival
McMaster of all he surveys
Drama with a Scottish accent, hours of Wagner, and Johnny Beattie, too. KEITH BRUCE previews the best Edinburgh Festival ever
{there is only a little about dance in this piece}
"HERE are but another three Edinburgh International Festivals to come from the directorship of Brian McMaster and it says a great deal for the standard he has set in the elegance and the excellence of his programmes that folk are already muttering about the impossibility of following such a class act. The cultural bill of fare for 2002 unveiled yesterday was unanimously acclaimed as among the strongest ever. It has such breadth that it is impossible to imagine any element of the audience that McMaster and his team has built feeling ignored, and at the same time it is quite intricately woven and contains elements of inspired innovation."
http://www.theherald.co.uk/arts/archive/22-3-19102-21-0-59.html

Eifman Ballet of St. Petersburg
'Karamazov' defeats choreographer
Eifman Ballet production still has some powerful moments
by Octavio Roca, Chronicle Dance Critic
"The piece is set to a recorded pastiche of Rachmaninoff, Mussorgsky and Wagner, to Gypsy songs, to brutal clapping and to eerie, devastating silence. It is by no means a dance version of the novel but rather a fantasy in movement of some of Dostoyevsky's most politically relevant themes.
    "The Karamazovs" is also, it must be said, not an artistic success. There is more to the novel than plot, but that plot is there to support Dostoyevsky's profoundly moving portrait of human nature. To reduce the novel to its themes is to rob the tale of its power to stir the soul."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/03/25/DD142106.DTL&type=performance

Lydia Johnson Company
A Strangely Cool and Eloquent Use of Arms
New York
By JENNIFER DUNNING
"The dances presented by Lydia Johnson and her company on Saturday night at the Theater of the Riverside Church stood out for their simplicity and quiet depth of abstracted feeling. Ms. Johnson trained with major New York teachers but has worked in New Jersey, where her troupe is based. That distance from the hectic, cliquish New York dance scene may have been a good thing for her. She is on to something, and that something is entirely her own.
    "
One unusual aspect of Ms. Johnson's choreography is the way she uses arms, giving them an importance usually vested only in the torso and the legs. The arms that reached and gestured from the standing women in "Hymn (In Three Sections)," a signature opening dance set to hymnal music by Mozart and Monteverdi, had a strangely cool, crisp eloquence."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/26/arts/dance/26LYDI.html

Violette Verdy
FILM REVIEW | 'VIOLETTE ET MR. B'
A Ballerina's Past Magic As Her Gift to the Future
New York
By ANNA KISSELGOFF
"George Balanchine went out of his way to recruit Violette Verdy into his New York City Ballet in 1958. Anyone who saw her enchanting performances there until 1976 could understand that Balanchine chose her because she was unlike, not like, his usual ballerinas.
    "Roland Petit, the French choreographer who gave Ms. Verdy her start as a teenager, says it best in "Violette et Mr. B," an 85-minute film by Dominique Delouche that will be shown today at Florence Gould Hall, 55 East 59th Street, Manhattan. Ms. Verdy will speak at the 6:30 screening but not at the others (12:30, 3:30 and 9 p.m.).
    "Balanchine wanted her because she brought to his company something it didn't have," Mr. Petit says. "She was unique, but she had what exceptional French female dancers had at that time: theatrical alchemy."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/26/movies/26VERD.html

Birmingham Hippodrome
Ballet lover kicks up a stink
By Sarah Tyrrell, Evening Mail
"A theater-goer has turned her nose up at making another visit to Birmingham Hippodrome after an Italian love story was spoilt by a strong pong of garlic.
    "Jill Bell, aged 60, from Bournville, complained during the interval of Romeo and Juliet by Birmingham Royal Ballet that it was too cold in the auditorium.
    "But when she returned to her seat she could not concentrate on the romantic tale because she was bowled over by a strong smell of garlic...."
http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100localnews/page.cfm?objectid=11733111&method=full

Ballroom...
A little learning...ballroom dancing
A weekly guide for those who fancy a bit of adult education for its own sake
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4381327,00.html

{given before - but here is the proper link to it}
New York City Ballet
One giant leap for America
The New York City Ballet has triumphed this season, with six world premieres announced for spring. Nadine Meisner applauds its innovative director, who stepped so gracefully in Balanchine's shoes
BY NADINE MEISNER
"Martins has been reviled and admired in equal measure. You can criticise some of his changes, but you can't deny that he has done his utmost to stir choreographic creativity and stretch his dancers with a cornucopia of ballets: 49 for the 2001-2 season, including six world premieres and four New York premieres. No other company has such a large, effervescent repertoire. (The Royal Ballet has less than half the number for the same period.) Nor - as befits a country where coffee comes served 20 different ways - such luxuriously flexible programming, able to offer as a matter of course the same ballets in pick'n'mix combinations.
    "The six world premieres, announced for spring, belong to the company's Diamond Project, a biennial festival started 10 years ago to encourage new work by choreographers from inside (eg the principal dancer, Albert Evans) and outside (eg the Australian Stephen Baynes). Last year's NYCB visit to the Edinburgh Festival focused on pieces produced by past Diamond Projects and, similarly, this spring's showcase on home ground will include a retrospective of 15 previous commissions to celebrate the 10th anniversary. But even without this, in a normal February week when I was there, the quantity of recent work was remarkable."
http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/features/story.jsp?story=278285


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

26-03-02, 09:37 AM (GMT)
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4. "RE: Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002 (2)"
In response to message #2
 
   According to Saturday's Glasgow Herald, the members of Scottish Ballet have unanimously rejected all five candidates being considered for the post of artistic director, saying they have insufficient stature. There is one British candidate, Ashley Page.
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020323007904

Members of Scottish Ballet also took part in Belfast's Earthquake Dance. The Irish Times has a review.
http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/features/2002/0326/2190140282ATTROY.html

Judith Flander's first review appeared in the Standard last night but is not, so far, available online. Here's a taster of what she wrote about the Royal Ballet's Giselle:

"Peter Wright's careful period production is too safe. It doesn't offend, but neither does it excite. It is suburban Gothic, a gentle meander through German legend, prettied up enough to make sure we leave humming the tutus. Without a central couple to focus on (she disdained Rojo and Corella), the core of the evening is missing: no madness, no terror, no sorrow or love that survives beyond death - nothing, in fact, except the bland leading the bland."


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

26-03-02, 04:13 PM (GMT)
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5. "RE: Tuesday Links - 26 March 2002 (3)"
In response to message #4
 
   The Standard's review of Giselle is online now. It's at http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/dance_review.html?in_review_id=284892&in_review_text_id=499935


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AnnWilliams

27-03-02, 09:15 AM (GMT)
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7. "RE: Wednesday links, 27th March "
In response to message #5
 
   Ismene Brown's Giselle review (through an unusual link):
Http://www.nycballet.com/news/2002/03/23/DTEL/0000-0950-KEYWORD.Missing.html

Jenny Glbert in the Independent on the French company Compagnie Montalvo-Hervieu: 'Travel to the northernmost limit of the Paris Metro and you find the flip-side of tourist France – a suburb so unremittingly ugly and downtrodden you'd think some malevolent town planner had put a curse on it. For the French, Créteil is a byword for crime, high unemployment and race-provoked violence. It is also the home of Verlan, the hip, back-to-front lingo of the suburban Paris underclass, which turns regular words on their heads to create a dialect incomprehensible to most French people and, more pointedly, to the police. It is an unlikely place to find a slice of paradise.'

Http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/features/story.jsp?story=278729

From the Guardian, Judith Mackrell on Wim Vandekeybus at The Place: 'Wim Vandekeybus's last show used an all-male cast to explore a charged, delicate and sometimes very funny world of men's dreams and desires. His new piece, Scratching the Inner Fields, is performed by women. Yet it fails to get under the skin and psyche...'

Http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4382559,00.html

This is very specialist but interesting. It is from the Ascribe Newswire. Antony Tudor's ballet, The Planets, has not been performed in more than 50 years. It is being reconstructed by the Duke University dance program and will be performed next week. "Planets" has four movements: Mars, Venus, Mercury and Neptune. Duke's dance program is reconstructing the two that were notated, Neptune and Venus.

http://www.ascribe.org/cgi-bin/spew4th.pl?fname=2002-03/20020322.133944&time=14:14+Pacific+Time&year=2002&public=1

The NY Times on an exhibition of James Wyeth's portraits of Rudolph Nureyev: "I've never worked with anybody who was that concerned with how I was doing him," Mr. Wyeth said. "He wanted to see everything. That finished me with doing portrait paintings for a while, because he was the first person I ever painted whose visage was his world, his life." He said Nureyev would look at a drawing in progress and say — Mr. Wyeth imitated Nureyev's accent — "My foot more beautiful than that."

Http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/27/arts/design/27WYET.html

Dance in Review from the NY Times (Jennifer Dunning, Jack Anderson):

Http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/27/arts/dance/27ROUN.html


The Miami City Herald on Arnold Quitane, who is leaving Miami City Ballet after 11 years: ''It's going to be downhill at some point, and I don't want to get there,'' he says. ``I got so much out of dancing with Miami City Ballet, and I don't think it will get better. I'm 37, and I want to do something else.''
Http://krd.realcities.com/ads/media/network/ent/popup.htm

The St. Petersburg Times (via the NY Times) on Mitslav Rostropovich conducting Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet with the LSO at London's Barbican 'He pranced about the podium, miming the ballet steps reflected in the score-swan's wings, tutu, tiara, toe shoes and all-and told the players a funny story about the time he dressed in drag and crashed a tribute concert for Isaac Stern.'
Http://www.sptimes.ru/archive/times/756/top/t_6066.htm

A story from the Toronto Globe & Mail on the new Atlantic Ballet Theatre of Canada:
'Igor Dobrovolskiy is putting a ballet dancer through his paces. To the strains of Mozart, the balding choreographer demonstrates to his young charge the moves he expects. Dobrovolskiy pirouettes, jumps and then flits off to one side of the small, boxy dance studio. While several other men and women in tights or baggy pants and fleeces limber up to one side, the male dancer attempts Dobrovolskiy's series of steps. The choreographer isn't satisfied. He makes the dancer do the moves over and over, exhorting him on in louder and louder Russian.'

link to article


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

27-03-02, 10:48 AM (GMT)
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9. "RE: Wednesday links, 27th March (2)"
In response to message #7
 
   Sarah Frater reviews Compagnie Marie Chouinard for the Evening Standard. "The dancers seem in constant crisis, and who believes that? We suspect they're crying wolf, one of the few creatures Chouinard omits from her menagerie."
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/dynamic/hottx/theatre/top_dance_review.html?in_review_id=527543&in_review_text_id=500620

Clement Crisp of the FT on the Royal Flemish Ballet's Swan Lake by Jan Fabre, a production that will be seen this year at the Edinburgh Festival. " It is Swan Lake as ego-trip, everything sacrificed to the producer's caprice. That these words could well apply to opera and drama suggests just how common is this "never mind the text; feel the special effects" view of production."
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020327001517


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AnnWilliams

28-03-02, 08:36 AM (GMT)
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10. "RE: Thursday links - 28th March"
In response to message #9
 
   New RB and Royal Opera Season
Winners and losers
The unveiling of Covent Garden's new season reveals a deeply divided institution. Antonio Pappano's first opera schedule is dazzling - but the ballet programme under Ross Stretton has shrunk alarmingly. Rupert Christiansen and Ismene Brown report
"Now, this shrinkage (in progarmmes/works)might be understandable had there been a freeze in grant; had there been no promises, when the opera house was being developed, that the Royal Ballet would become a more active creative body than before; and no trumpeting of Stretton as a fresh wind of vision. But when the new opera house opened, the Royal Ballet got an awesome grant increase, up from £6.45 million to £9 million overnight. And yet what we see now is a shorter London season, many fewer ballets, much less creativity. Where has all that extra money gone? At the press conference Tony Hall, the ROH chief executive, had no answer. Taxpayers, as well as ballet-lovers who expect the Royal Ballet to lead not follow fashion, deserve one."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F03%2F28%2Fbtroh28.xml

John Percival in the Independent on POB's Hurlevent (Wuthering Heights): 'My guess is that Mats Ek might be the biggest single influence on the movement, but the real decisive factor is that Belarbi grew up under the multifarious repertoire choices of Rudolf Nureyev's directorship, providing a uniquely wide background of ballet, old and new. Bold, intelligent and sometimes surprising choices based on this let him concentrate on revealing the subject: not through continuous narrative, but by decisive incidents.'
Http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020328000915&query=ballet

Nadine Meisner on the RB's Giselle in yesterday's Independent: 'After the 150th viewing, there are some ballets that pall for even the most committed spectator, but Giselle isn't one of them. This perfectly formed, two-act jewel has held audiences in its imaginative grip ever since its creation in 1841. It must be the emotional punch - transcending the quaint Rhineland setting, bouncy peasantry and Romantic stylisation - that gives it its timeless power.'

Http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020327001190&query=ballet

Deborah Jowett's weekly sweep of the NY dance scene in 'Village Voice'. Seems she doesn't much like Yoshiko Chuma's offering:
'I'm usually laid-back about what's dance and what isn't. But I'm pretty sure Yoshiko Chuma's p = 3.14 . . . isn't.' (she surely ought to have smelled a rat with that title...)
Http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0213/jowitt.php

New RB/ROH 2002/2003 Season Details announced
We have a thread with complete details and thoughts on the next season at Covent Garden. Have a good read and then tell us what you think....
Http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/news/1252.html


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alison

28-03-02, 05:36 PM (GMT)
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11. "RE: Thursday links - 28th March"
In response to message #10
 
   There are also reactions to the new ROH season in the Times and the Financial Times, although the latter concentrates on the Royal Opera and passes over the Royal Ballet's repertoire in one sentence.


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AnnWilliams

29-03-02, 08:03 AM (GMT)
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12. "RE: Friday links 29th March"
In response to message #11
 
   Ismene Brown in the Telegraph on the Posh 'n Becks of ballet: Sarah Wildor and Adam Cooper, one of ballet's most beautiful couples, fail to avoid explosive topics as they tell Ismene Brown about life since Wildor resigned from the Royal Ballet.
link to article

Debra Craine in the Times on the changes afoot for both the RB and the ENB: 'Here's a question for ballet-lovers in the 21st century. How much do you want your art form to change? That's the issue facing Britain's two biggest ballet companies, the Royal Ballet and English National Ballet, both of whom recently acquired new directors committed to expanding the artistic horizons of their respective companies. In a few years, assuming they get what they want, the landscape of British ballet will have changed considerably, thanks to Ross Stretton at the Royal and Matz Skoog at ENB.'

Http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,266-250665,00.html#

Maev Kennedy in the Guardian on the ROH's recent announcement on its democraticising efforts. The pice contains some useful price comparisons with other opera houses world-wide:

Http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4384061,00.html


Fiona Maddocks in the Evening Standard interviews Antonio Pappano, the ROH's new musical director: "The strange thing is, I am having to get to know London all over again. I left it as a kid. And, of course, it has changed a huge amount in 30 years. I feel strongly I belong here, but I'm still, in every sense, finding my way around."

Http://www.thisislondon.com/html/hottx/theatre/top_direct.html

The Washington Post interviews Yorgos Loukos, AD of Lyon Opera Ballet, whose 'Cendrillon' opens in Washington tonight: 'This spin on "Cinderella," set to Prokofiev's score, premiered in the United States in 1987; choreographed for the company by Maguy Marin, it includes a life-size dollhouse set by Montserrat Casanova and doll-like masks by Monique Luyton. "There is a strong classical tradition in European theater," Loukos explains. "You have a choice to do a so-so classical repertoire usually with fewer dancers and less support than you need to do a good job . . . or you can do what we're doing." '

Http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A31048-2002Mar28.html



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Bruceadmin

29-03-02, 09:22 AM (GMT)
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13. "Hampson again..."
In response to message #12
 
   >Debra Craine in the Times on
>the changes afoot for both
>the RB and the ENB:
>Http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,266-250665,00.html#
>

Loved this bit:
"However, Skoog doesn’t think buying in new work from abroad is the answer. “Foreign acquisitions are exciting but I don’t think that’s where the future of British ballet lies. It lies here in Britain, in working with British choreographers, both classical and contemporary.”

Unlike Stretton at Covent Garden, ENB’s boss has a promising British choreographer he can rely upon. This season Christopher Hampson’s Double Concerto was a surprise hit, a stylish classical work which will be seen again in late May when ENB performs at the Royal Opera House for the first time in its history. Hampson has also been entrusted with ENB’s new Nutcracker, to be unveiled in Bristol in October with designs by the cartoonist Gerald Scarfe.

ENB’s budget and resources are about half those of the Royal but, potentially, it has in Hampson an invaluable talent who, unlike Preljocaj, Duato or Ek, places his trust in the future of classical ballet. "


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AnnWilliams

29-03-02, 09:50 AM (GMT)
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14. "RE: Friday links - 29th March (2)"
In response to message #13
 
   Here's one I missed earlier......Sanjoy Roy in the Guardian on Compagnie Marie Chouinard at The Place : 'Another sequence shows the twists and jerks that a man has to make when partnered by a woman who has grabbed his hair into two fist-sized topknots, while a third has three women whirling and freezing their arms in unison, like sputtering propellers. These simple concepts are made compelling by the intricately complex movement and the sheer technical precision of the dancers'

Http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4384020,00.html


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

30-03-02, 08:58 AM (GMT)
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15. "RE: Saturday 30th"
In response to message #14
 
   LAST EDITED ON 30-03-02 AT 09:54 AM (GMT)

Sylvie Guillem is profiled by Ismene Brown for the Telegraph. "She longed to perform Cranko's tragic Onegin at Covent Garden this season, but the owners of the Cranko rights did not even see her. "Well, yes, it did surprise me. I don't know the guys. Maybe they have something against me that I don't know about But then I saw that they didn't want Jonathan Cope, the senior man at Covent Garden, for the part of Onegin either, so I started to laugh. Frankly, these are people I don't want to meet."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=%2Farts%2F2002%2F03%2F30%2Fbtisme30.xml

Judith Mackrell writes for the Guardian on how Carmen has been represented in the ballet tradition. "For Mats Ek the interesting feature of Carmen is her usurping of traditional roles. She is the predator, the risk taker, the seasoned one-night-stander, and she swaggers around the stage with a cigar rather than a rose between her teeth. "
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4384313,00.html

Giannandrea Poesio's review for the Spectator of the Royal Ballet's Giselle is not online, but here is a flavour. "Cojocaru is the quintessential contemporary incarnation of what Theophile Gautier wanted Giselle to be, namely the untlimate Romantic heroine. I find it difficult to remember when was the last time I saw such as sublimely seamless combination of dancing and acting."

The former San Francisco Chronicle critic Allan Ulrich has left the paper, but is still writing for the SF website Voice of Dance. In his new column, he reflects on the role of the critic in the SF area. "Frustrated dance writers, in search of a fee, now review almost anything that moves as dance. Let a play contain a smidgen of organized locomotion amid all the dialogue, and the same crowd turns up."
http://www.voiceofdance.org/Insights/features.test.cfm?LinkID=27500000000000071

From the Moscow Times: "St. Petersburg dominates this year's Golden Mask festival nominations for opera and ballet and seems likely, given the strength of what it has on offer, to clobber the competition when awards are handed out April 15." The story mentions a triple bill of Neumeier ballets from the Kirov, as well as the company's controversial new Nutcracker. http://www.tmtmetropolis.ru/metropolis/stories/2002/03/29/102.html

And Mick Jagger is taking ballet lessons as he prepares for the Stones' 40th anniversary tour (mentioned as an aside in a Telegraph story).
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=%2Fnews%2F2002%2F03%2F30%2Fnstone30.xml

Ann Kisselgoff of the NY Times on Boris Eichman Ballet. "You won't find such daring actor-dancers anywhere else, not even in other Russian companies, where the heroic style has gone out of fashion. Mr. Eifman's emblematic aesthetic is the antithesis of that old Romantic-realistic mix, but he has preserved its innate passion and channeled it into something new."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/30/arts/dance/30EIFM.html

The ballet choreographer Jose Mateo talks to the Boston Herald. "For all of its sophistication and refinement,'' said Mateo, ``ballet is lagging way behind the other art forms in terms of advancing into the 21st century. It's barely come out of the 19th century.''
http://www2.bostonherald.com/entertainment/arts_culture/danc03292002.htm

The artistic director of Lyons Ballet, Yorgos Loukos, talks to the Washington Post about his company's production of "Cendrillon," now at the Kennedy Center. "This spin on "Cinderella," set to Prokofiev's score, premiered in the United States in 1987; choreographed for the company by Maguy Marin, it includes a life-size dollhouse set by Montserrat Casanova and doll-like masks by Monique Luyton. "There is a strong classical tradition in European theater," Loukos explains. "You have a choice to do a so-so classical repertoire usually with fewer dancers and less support than you need to do a good job . . . or you can do what we're doing."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A31048-2002Mar28.html


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

30-03-02, 10:25 AM (GMT)
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16. "RE: Saturday 30th (2)"
In response to message #15
 
   LAST EDITED ON 30-03-02 AT 10:47 AM (GMT)

The Guardian's Martin Kettle reflects on this week's ROH announcements. "Listening to Tony Hall and Antonio Pappano laying out their latest plans for the Royal Opera House this week was an unfamiliar experience. It was hard to believe that this was the same Covent Garden that has been a byword for conflict, embarrassment and mismanagement for so long. In the past, these annual press conferences in Bow Street sometimes signalled a bloodletting. But even Gordon Brown at his most irresistible could not have produced so much unremitting good news as the new management laid before us."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4384312,00.html

From Thursday's FT, but only now online, a piece by Tony Thorncroft on the ROH's plans for the coming year. "Next Tuesday Tony Hall celebrates his first year as general director of the Royal Opera House. Pipped by Greg Dyke for the top job at the BBC, where he had spent his career, Hall accepted the challenge of Covent Garden, which was just emerging from years in the media doghouse. He must be happy that he took the gamble. yesterday he launched the 2002-03 season for a Covent Garden which is now enjoying glowing reviews for most of its performances and which faces a more secure future.
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/article.html?id=020328001772

From Thursday's Indie, David Lister on the new year at the ROH.
"Antonio Pappano, who has succeeded Sir Bernard Haitink as music director, said that when he first came to Covent Garden to conduct 11 years ago he was treated "like a leper". "It will be a priority of mine to go backstage and make singers and musicians feel welcome," he said."
http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=279284

Also from Thursday, the BBC's reportage of the ROH survey of its audience. "The Royal Opera House (ROH), London, is attracting more and more first time visitors, with a third of bookings from people new to the venue, according to new research. The findings back the ROH's claims that it is attracting a less elitist audience."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/entertainment/arts/newsid_1898000/1898441.stm


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

30-03-02, 11:06 AM (GMT)
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17. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #16
 
   LAST EDITED ON 30-03-02 AT 11:07 AM (GMT)

This is extremely interesting. According to the US network ABC News, some dancers are ditching the traditional pointe shoes ("made from layers of burlap, cardboard, newspaper, and tiny nails")in favor of shoes constructed from elastomeric plastic. ""It's 2002; why can't dancers have more comfortable shoes? Runners get amazing things, why can't we?" said Jennifer Quent, a Corps de Ballet member of the American Ballet Theatre. Quent and her colleagues Karin Ellis-Wentz and soloist Gillian Murphy wear Gaynor Mindens, which are constructed from layers of pliable plastic and are five times as durable as traditional pointe shoes. Due to the rigors of dancing en pointe, a traditional shoe may last only one hour. A Gaynor Minden can last up to five days.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/TechTV/balletshoes_techtv020329.html


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PhilipBadmin

30-03-02, 04:09 PM (GMT)
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18. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #17
 
   Usual thorough journalism:
"As 'Tech Live' reports...", cutting edge, new technology, "it's 2002", etc, etc.
And then, mid-way through the piece:
"Allison Jay, a dancer with Smuin Ballets/SF and a part-time ballet teacher, wore Gaynor Mindens for about three years when she danced with Hartford Ballet."

Very recent development then! Obviously set the world alight. Ah well, still interesting.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

30-03-02, 04:39 PM (GMT)
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19. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #18
 
   LAST EDITED ON 30-03-02 AT 05:06 PM (GMT)

Philip, I fail to see the problem. Even if it is not a very new story, it is still entirely legit for a generalist science mag (we're not talking 'Nature' here) to bring something, which would otherwise been unfamiliar to the general public, into a wider domain. Your slur on "the usual thorough journalism", is, I think, overdone.

As far as its selection for today's links is concerned, what the ABC story said about the evolution of the pointe shoe will, I'm pretty sure, have been new to many readers of this site.


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AEHandley

30-03-02, 05:59 PM (GMT)
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20. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #19
 
   On another related point(e), does anyone know if the carbon fibre shank (as featured in some Gamba shoes in the 90s) has caught on more widely? I thought it was pretty good.


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Carly Gillies

30-03-02, 07:12 PM (GMT)
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21. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #20
 
   Gaynor Minden web site

http://www.dancer.com/


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Viviane

30-03-02, 08:24 PM (GMT)
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22. "RE: Gaynor Minden"
In response to message #21
 
   GM pointeshoes are since 1993-94 on the market, so I can agree with Philip.
Their biggest problem is the numerous variety in widths(3), boxstyles(3), shanks(5), vamp-(3)and heelheights(4)and the 5 types of stiffnesses. You need a highy skilled 'custom fitter' to find the shoe that fits you like a glove. You can 'adjust'(they don't break in and don't soften)the shoe by heating with a hairdryer but lots of dancers are not keen to do this. A positive point is the 'quietness' of the shoes (a good thing in times where dancers don't have the time to soften their shoes !)...but it's a pity the satin wears much(!) quicker than on ordinary shoes..and shows the blue elastomeric...and in general they just don't look as good as the traditional ones. Some dancers love them and others detest them.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

30-03-02, 09:01 PM (GMT)
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23. "RE: Gaynor Mindens"
In response to message #22
 
   Please can any further thoughts on this be placed on the new thread http://www.danze.co.uk/dcforum/happening/2594.html# ,rather than here on daily links?


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Bruceadmin

31-03-02, 06:23 AM (GMT)
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24. "RE: Saturday 30th (3)"
In response to message #18
 
   Have to say I saw the Mindon story and it raised a smile in me also.

Gaynor Minden have always been very switched on to publicity (for a pointe shoe maker!) and net aware very early on - hence the URL they bagged (http://www.dancer.com/)

When I started Ballet.co there were precious few other dance sites around and Mindens were one of them and at that time had an excellent section on the history of ballet. I also remember getting a semi-indignant email from one of them because we had not listed them in a piece about dance clothing. Easily defended because at that time the only piece of clothing they sold was a T-shirt I think (something we also happened to sell at the time!).

Anyway they're on the ball in a Sales and Marketing sense - none of which means its not a good story to run periodically and I'm sure they continue to refine their product anyway.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

31-03-02, 07:15 AM (GMT)
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25. "RE: Sunday 31st"
In response to message #24
 
   Jann Parry of the Observer is struck by the 'power of the primitive' at three performances she saw this week; the RB's Giselle, and pieces by Wim Vandekeybus and Marie Chouinard. "Cojocaru is eerily pure and weightless as a Wili. At her core, though, is a steely determination to save her lover (Johan Kobborg). The magnetism between them transforms him into a purer spirit, able to match her perfection. Dancing like this touches parts of the soul beyond the reach of cries of anguish."
http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4384697,00.html

For the Sunday Times, David Dougill reviews Giselle, Richard Alston and Wim Vandekeybus. "As a feat of storytelling through dance, it would be hard to better Alina Cojocaru and Johan Kobborg in the Royal Ballet’s Giselle. The empathy between them is astonishing — already they seem like those long-married couples who habitually finish each other’s sentences — and, as a result, every tiny element is brought out with perfect clarity."
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/article/0,,187-249293,00.html

Hugh Canning of the Sunday Times looks forward to Antonio Pappano's arrival at the ROH. "We can expect from Pappano a stronger presence and more “hands-on” leadership than displayed by Haitink, who, for all his musical authority and heroic salvation of the ROH orchestra during the (now mostly forgotten) dark days of the closure period, has often been an absentee music director."
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/article/0,,187-249422,00.html

The Sunday Times' Paul Driver thinks that Brian Elias's orchestral piece "The House That Jack Built", cries out to be a ballet. Elias wrote the score for Macmillan's The Judas Tree.
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/article/0,,187-249441,00.html

The Sunday Herald on 'Wishing For The Moon', by the new Scottish independent dance company The Ensemble Group
http://www.sundayherald.com/23407

Anna Kisselgoff of the NY Times on Lyon Opera Ballet. "The biggest mistake would be to see it as a "contemporary" dance company of the neither-fish-nor-fowl type led by Jiri Kylian and his disciple, Nacho Duato. Their dancers are also ballet-trained, but their signature style is their reliance on a hybrid idiom. By contrast, the Lyon company members resemble modern dancers when they perform works by American postmodern choreographers like Susan Marshall and Bill T. Jones. Conversely, they reveal solid toe work and classical technique in William Forsythe's pieces."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/31/arts/dance/31KISS.html

The NY Times on the choreographer Lucinda Childs at 61. "Even at her most austere, as in "Dance," Ms. Childs approaches her work with a rich sense of theater. "I wanted to be an actress before I started dancing," she said. "Every chance I could when I was growing up in New York, I would go to see wonderful Broadway productions. What fascinated me was how the actors got inside their roles and managed to be convincing without you feeling any effort. I find that quality with the dancers I work with. They enjoy the concentration."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/31/arts/dance/31KOUR.html

From the BBC News website, details of a set-top box, newly on sale, making it possible to watch digital TV without paying a subscription.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/entertainment/tv_and_radio/newsid_1900000/1900374.stm


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

31-03-02, 01:20 PM (GMT)
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26. "RE: Sunday 31st - correction"
In response to message #25
 
   The Sunday Times reviewer was Clifford Bishop, not David Dougill. Apologies - I was on autopilot.


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AnnWilliams

31-03-02, 02:07 PM (GMT)
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27. "RE: Sunday 31st "
In response to message #26
 
   There's a fascinating article by Julie Kavanagh in today's Sunday Telegraph magazine - the byeline (or whatever it is) tells the story:

'Both Nureyev & Baryshnokov trained under Alexander Pushkin, the greatest of the Kirov's ballet professors. Both stayed with him at his tiny Leningrad flat - where Nureyev fell in love with Pushkin's wife. Julie Kavanagh tells a tale of devotion, defection and sexual deceit'


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alison

03-04-02, 01:15 PM (GMT)
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28. "RE: Hampson again..."
In response to message #13
 
   Hated this bit:

"Box-office considerations mean that Derek Deane’s limp staging of Alice in Wonderland is being revived next season, a decision Skoog takes reluctantly." Hope it's the spring tour


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