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Subject: "Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Conferences What's Happening Topic #2130
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Ann Williams

28-09-01, 03:43 PM (GMT)
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"Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
 
   At Bruce's sugestion, I am opening up a thread for anyone who was at today's service in Westminster Abbey to post their thoughts or comments. I am working up a short piece myself which I will add later and Bruce will also be commenting.


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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Bruce Madmin 28-09-01 1
     RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Ann Williams 28-09-01 2
         RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Brendan McCarthymoderator 29-09-01 3
         RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Helen 29-09-01 4
             RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Fiona 29-09-01 5
                 RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Brendan McCarthymoderator 01-10-01 6
                     RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Bruce Madmin 01-10-01 7
                     RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Jane S 01-10-01 8
                         RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Paul A 02-10-01 9
                             RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... Brendan 02-10-01 10
                             RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.0... alison 02-10-01 11

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Bruce Madmin

28-09-01, 08:20 PM (GMT)
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1. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #0
 
   Here are the printed words for the service at Westminster Abbey - I've laid them out page by page. They have been scanned in and therfore there may be the odd silly for which we profusely apologise. We will be tidying this up some more and presenting on proper pages shortly.


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Page 2 -
(Blank)


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Page 3



SAID THE CHILD ...

I love you...
I shall love you as long as you live
And when you are dead
I shall love you as long as I live,
And when I am dead
I shall love you as long as God lives.

When death passes by
There is rebirth of love,
Recurring, unswerving,
Philosophically wrought.
What more can God ask
Of the faithful than this?

Dame Ninette de Valois


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Page 4


The whole of the church is served by a hearing loop. Users should turn their hearing aid to the setting marked T.

Before the service the~ bells of the Abbey church are rung.

The service is sung by the Choir of WestminsterAbbey, conducted by James O’Donnell, Organist and Master of the Choristers.

The organ is played by Andrew Reid, Sub-Organist.

Before the service, The Royal Ballet Symfonia, conducted by Barry Wordsworth, plays:


Prospect before us 4th movement

    William Boyce (1711-79)
    Constant Lambert (1905-51)

Sheep may safely graze

    Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    arr. William Walton (1902-83)

Black Queen, Red Knight, Bishops from Checkmate

    Arthur Bliss (1891-1975)


Opening of Act 2 from The Nutcracker

    Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky (1840-93)

Saraband from The Rakes Progress

    Gordon (1901-1970)

Rag Mazurka from Les Biches

    Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

Satan, Pavane, Galliard, Altar Dance, Heavenly Pavane from Job

    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)



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Page 5

The Lord Mayor of Westminster is received at the Great West Door by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. All stand as the Lord Mayor is conducted to his Stall in the Quire, and then sit.


The Representative of Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Gloucester is received at the Great West Door by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. All remain seated.


The Representative of His Royal Highness The Duke of York is received at the Great West Door by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. All remain seated.


The Representative of Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh is received at the Great West Door by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. All remain seated.


Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon and The Lady Sarah Chatto are received at the Great West Door by the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. All remain seated.


All stand as the Dean conducts the Representative of Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh, Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon, The Lady Sarah Chatto and the Representatives of other members of The Royal Family to their places in the Quire.


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Page 6 -
(blank)


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Page 7


ORDER OF SERVICE

All stand to sing


THE HYMN

during which the Collegiate Procession, moves to places in the Quire and Sacrarium.

PRAISE, my soul, the King of Heaven;
to his feet thy tribute bring.
Ransomed, healed, restored, forgiven,
who like me his praise should sing?
Praise him! praise him!
praise the everlasting King.

Praise him for his grace and favour
to our fathers in distress;
praise him still the same for ever,
slow to chide, and swift to bless
Praise him! praise him!
glorious In his faithfulness.

Choristers: Father-like, he tends and spares us;
well our feeble frame he knows;
in his hands he gently bears us,
rescues us from all our foes.
Praise him! praise him!
widely as his mercy flows.

Angels, help us to adore him;
ye behold him face to face;
sun and moon, bow down before him;
dwellers all in time and space.
Praise him! praise him!
praise with us the God of grace.


Praise my soul 436 NEH
John Goss (1800-80)
H F Lyte (1793-1847)
Psalm 103



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Page 8

All remain standing. The Very Reverend Dr Wesley Carr, Dean of
Westminster, says

THE BIDDING

WE meet in Westminster Abbey today to remember and honour the memory of a remarkable lady. Ninette de Valois’ long life was chiefly devoted to ballet. Of all her work, the Royal Ballet, of which she was effectively the founder, stands as her enduring achievement. But in this congregation are many others who came into contact with her and were inspired to become something more than they had thought themselves capable of.

But we have not come to the Abbey to record history or draft a biography. We have come, whatever our faith, to a place of prayer and worship. "Dance", said Martha Graham, "is the hidden language of the soul." We thank God for all who through their art and skill stir our hearts, challenge our thinking and speak this language of the soul.

We shall hear about Dame Ninette, her life and achievements; we shall reflect on what she represented for each of us and for all who live in and enjoy dance; we shall thank God for her contribution to the nation’s cultural life; and we shall pray, for all concerned with dance, especially, as she would have wished, those who direct schools and bring young talent to the fore.

Drawing these and all our thoughts together we pray:

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.



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Page 9

All sit. Sir Anthony Dowell, CBE, formerly Director of The Royal Ballet reads

1 PETER 1: 3-9

BLESSED be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ!
By his great mercy he has given us a new birth into a living
hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and
into an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading,
kept in heaven for you, who are being protected by the power of
God through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last
time. In this you rejoice, even if now for a little while you have
had to suffer various trials, so that the genuineness of your faith-
being more precious than gold that, though perishable, is tested
by fire - may be found to result in praise and glory and honor
when Jesus Christ is revealed. Although you have not seen him,
you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you
believe in him and rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy,
for you are receiving the outcome of your faith, the salvation of
your souls.

This is the word of the Lord.
All: Thanks be to God.


All remain seated. Alexander Stannus, great-nephew, reads

DANCERS IN ACTION

THEY are filled with a quietude
And feel the dedication of their bodies
To movements that are self contained.
Challenging all the formal laws of form,
And with a symmetry that quivers
Within its own acute awareness.
As a light wave is their golden glow
That warms the sluggish outline of those static forms
Who sit and watch with riveted attention.
Now this distant world falls into focus
As the extended curve of bodies reaches
To encroach on space, where the dancers will
Surmount their earthbound earthiness.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Page 10

The movement’s peak is reached, and their return
Carries the speed and swoop of unhampered swallows
While all earth’s pressures wait to converge on
Lithe limb and brain and movement’s ecstasy;
But their own world encases them,
And stillness reigns in that retreat
‘Where mind would scrutinise afresh,
Recalling that strange moment of great power
Which was their body’s exploration of
A unity that this instant ceased to be.

Dame Ninette de Valois


All remain seated. Louise Verity, great-niece, reads

"I LOVE PUBS"
(Monologue Overheard)

THE old one enters and orders her drink...
"I'm alone,"she says,
"Here and everywhere else.
But pubs are not lonely and I don’t have to think."

"No pushing, no jostling, casual and kind
Is the company here.
You don’t have to speak.
I’m lonely you see, but here I don’t mind."

"And the music they play is muffled and slow.
An old person’s life
Stands still at the end
That’s something the tunes don’t know."

"I love pubs; I’ve always done so.
They are quiet and solid,
There’s peace in the mind
With everything moving just to and fro."

And I do the same...


Dame Ninette de Valois



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Page 11

All stand to sing


THE HYMN

THE King of love my Shepherd is,
Whose goodness faileth never;
I nothing lack if I am his,
And he is mine for ever.

‘Where streams of living water flow
My ransomed soul he leadeth,
And where the verdant pastures grow
With food celestial feedeth.

Perverse and foolish oft I strayed,
But yet in love he sought me,
And on his shoulder gently laid,
And home, rejoicing, brought me.

In death’s dark vale I fear no ill
With thee, dear Lord, beside me;
Thy rod and staff my comfort still,
Thy cross before to guide me.

Thou spread’st a table in my sight;
Thy unction, grace bestoweth:
And 0 what transport of delight
From thy pure chalice floweth!

And so through all the length of days
Thy goodness faileth never;
Good Shepherd, may I sing thy praise
Within thy house for ever.


Dominus Regit Me 457 (ii) NEH
JB. Dykes (1823-76)
H. W. Baker (1821-1877)



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Page 12


All sit for

THE ADDRESS
by
Sir Peter Wright CBE
Director Laureate, Birmingham Royal Ballet


All remain seated. The Choir sings

THE ANTHEM

O BE joyful in the Lord, all ye lands: serve the Lord with
gladness, and come before his presence with a song.
Be ye sure that the Lord he is God: it is he that hath made us,
and not we ourselves; we are his people, and the sheep of his
pasture.
0 go your way into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his
courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and speak good of
his Name.
For the Lord is gracious, his mercy is everlasting: and his truth
endureth from generation to generation.

William Walton (1902-83)
Psalm 100


All remain seated. The Reverend Dominic Fenton, Precentor of
Westminster Abbey, leads

THE PRAYERS

LET us give thanks to God for his gift in men, women and children everywhere of a pulse of life within us, expressed in rhythm and dance. For those to whom he has given special gifts of body and mind; of physical grace and movement; and especially for all who enrich human life through the medium of ballet.
Let us bless the Lord:
Thanks be to God.

LET us thank God for the special gifts given to Ninette de Valois, whose life and achievements we celebrate today.
Let us bless the Lord:
Thanks be to God.



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Page 13

LET us pray for dancers and choreographers, for composers and designers, for musicians, and for all who are engaged in the administration of the arts; and let us pray that we may be faithful stewards of the gifts which God has given to us, and that we may use them for the good of others.
Lord hear us:
Lord graciously hear us.

ALMIGHTY God, we praise you for your servant Ninette and or all by whose gifts the life of humankind has been enriched: and we pray that by the dedication of our own abilities we may be enabled to share with others the great inheritance which we have received, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

O GOD, who by thy spirit in our hearts dost lead us to desire thy perfection, to seek for truth and to rejoice in beauty: illuminate and inspire, we beseech thee, all dancers, writers and musicians; that in whatsoever is true and pure and lovely, thy name may be hallowed and thy kingdom come on earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

All stand to sing

THE HYMN

LOVE divine, all loves excelling,
joy of heaven, to earth come down,
fix in us thy humble dwelling,
all thy faithful mercies crown.
Jesu, thou art all compassion,
pure unbounded love thou art;
visit us with thy salvation,
enter every trembling heart.

Come, almighty to deliver,
let us all thy grace receive;
suddenly return, and never,
never more thy temples leave.
Thee we would be always blessing,
serve thee as thy hosts above;
pray, and praise thee, without ceasing,
glory in thy perfect love.



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page 14

Finish then thy new creation:
pure and spotless let us be;
let us see thy great salvation,
perfectly restored in thee;
changed from glory into glory
till in heaven we take our place,
till we cast our crowns before thee,
lost in wonder, love, and praise.

Blaenwern NEH 408
William P Rowlands (1860-1937)
Charles Wesley (1707-88)


All remain standing. The Dean says


THE BLESSING

Fiji HE Lord bless you and watch over you, the Lord make his
face shine upon you and be gracious to you, the Lord look
kindly on you and give you peace; and the blessing of God
almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, be among you,
and remain with you always. Amen.

All remain standing as the Procession moves to the west end of the
church.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Page 15

The Orchestra plays:

Rose Adagio from The Sleeping Beauty Pyotr ll'yich Tchaikovsky


Members of the Congregation are requested to remain in
their places until directed to move by the Stewards.


The bells of the Abbey Church are rung.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Page 15






Printed by
Barnard & Westwood Ltd
9 Railway Street, London Ni 9EE
By Appointment to Her Majesty The Queen
Printers and Stationers
Printers to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster




(end)


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Ann Williams

28-09-01, 09:30 PM (GMT)
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2. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #1
 
  
The great, vaulted ceiling and sombre stained glass windows of the 13th century Westminster Abbey lend dignity to the simplest of ceremonies, and today's thankgiving ceremony for Ninette de Valois was certainly simple though, fittingly, it was also very elegant.

The sunshine of this beautiful autumn day helped. The great west door of the Abbey remained open throughout the hour-long ceremony, lending dazzling perspective to the nave, which, for this occasion was split by two banks of facing pews. The procession of the starry and the not-so-starry guests filed between the pews towards the choir and out of our view, leading to whispers of 'Isn't that Sibley?' Or 'I'm sure that's Lynn Seymour..'. They were all there, of course, every name you could think of in the ballet hierarchy.

Then came the dignitaries - chief among them the wheelchair-bound HRH Princess Margaret accompanied by her daughter Lady Sarah Chatto. I thought it was incredibly brave of the Princess to put in this appearance; she is obviously a sick woman, her face almost obscured by enormous dark glasses. Finally came the clergy, choristers and the Dean of Westminster

As the congregation was assembling the Royal Ballet Symfonia, conducted by Barry Wordsworth, played pieces from de Valois' ballets, as well as from 'Nutcracker' and 'Les Biches' (presumably the latter two were particular favourites of hers).

I sat with Bruce and Brendan, following the proceedings from the Order of Service booklet, (which Bruce has scanned in). Its first page carries a rare photograph of de Valois smiling the most dazzling of smiles (she seems to have considered it a point of honour to look as stern as possible in photographs, possibly to reinforce her fearsome reputation), but this photograph shows that she was actually rather a beautiful woman.

Anthony Dowell read from the First Letter of St. Peter, and did it beautifully. Alexander Stannus, her great-nephew, read a piece of her poetry 'Dancers in Action', and her great-niece, Louise Verity recounted some family recollections which, sadly, were all but inaudible in the echoing vastness of the nave. Ironically, she was the only one we could actually see speaking; the other speakers were all invisible from where we were sitting.

The core of the service was Sir Peter Wright's address, which was profoundly touching. He said, among other things, that she was one of the most brilliant women of the twentieth century and I don't suppose there was a single one of us present who did not agree. He didn't attempt to gloss over her faults - he said she could be contradictory, petty and even ruthless, but his affection and respect shone through. I loved one particular anecdote. He recalled that she came back to the stage at the age of 52 after a thirteen-year gap to dance the maid in Ashton's 'A Wedding Bouquet'. When the curtain went up and the audience recognised de Valois, they went wild and continued going wild for several seconds. De Valois silenced them completely and instantaneously with one commanding gesture of her arm. 'From being complete pandemonium, the place suddenly went so quiet that you could have heard a pin drop', Sir Peter said. (This story probably says all one needs to say about de Valois' authority). He covered her whole career in his wide-ranging address, listing her achievements - the establishment of three major companies (the Royal Ballet, the Royal Birmingham Ballet and the National Ballet of Turkey) as well as the Royal Ballet School before concluding his address by saying simply 'She was my boss until her dying day'.

I hope that the full transcript of Sir Peter's address will be published somewhere shortly, because he said a great deal more that I have been able to recollect here (maybe others present will be able to recollect more?).

As the service ended, the great and the good filed past us once again and I tried to memorise all the names and faces. Among the senior presences that I recognised were Pamel May, Beryl Gray, Alicia Markove and Alexander Grant, and amongst the somewhat younger Merel Park, Antoinette Sibley, Lynn Seymour, Lesley Collier, Donald MacLeary, Monica Mason and Anthony Dowell (obviously) together with Ross Stretton (I probably just imagined the shifty look on the latter's face..). Bright-eyed attentive RB students, rows of them, considerably lowered the average age of the congregation. There were countless others. Sir Jeremy Isaacs was there, and a busload (yes, a busload) of BRB dancers, including principals, accompanied by David Bintley and wife.

As we filed out of the Abbey into the autumn sunshine, the orchestra played the Rose Adagio music from Sleeping Beauty, and never has it sounded so rich, so profound and so moving to me. I have tears in my eyes thinking about it now.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

29-09-01, 08:06 AM (GMT)
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3. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #2
 
   When Louise Verity spoke about her grand-aunt, we could scarcely hear a word. Her tribute was swallowed up in the echoing vastness of the Abbey. But it was no less moving for that. She spoke about Edris, for that was how her family knew her, Edris Stannus. It is a very Victorian name for one of the most modern of women. Her family must have felt astonishment at how Edris became to the world Madam Ninette de Valois. But to them she was always Edris – and the rises and falls of her grandniece’s voice were an eloquent testament to the love they felt for her, and their pride in her vast achievement.

The liturgists who wrote yesterday’s service did so with imagination. The prayers were apt, as was the evocation of Martha Graham’s description of dance as “the hidden language of the soul”. Ninette de Valois was a woman of faith – religious and artistic. The service evoked both.

When Peter Wright spoke, what shone through was his portrait of Madam as a great creative leader and encourager of others’ gifts. He talked of her pride in her choreographers, notably Kenneth MacMillan and John Cranko, and her devastation at their early deaths. “She loved them both so much”, he said. She felt similarly about Fonteyn and Nureyev. Wright’s words were a reminder to the congregation that creativity must be loved, encouraged, supported. Ninette de Valois did all that, and, in doing so, enriched so many lives.

Peter Wright spoke too of her time in Dublin at the Abbey Theatre and her collaboration with WB Yeats on his Plays for Dancers. It was a subtle reminder to us of Madam’s Anglo-Irish origins. The words on her coat of arms (reproduced on the order of service) read “Et Vi et Virtute”. A rough translation might be “by dint of excellence, and – if necessary – bloody-mindedness” That was the woman through and through.

On the frontispiece of her autobiography, she quotes Yeats' lines:

"I am of Ireland,
And the Holy Land of Ireland,
"And time runs on", cried she.
"Come out of charity,
"Come dance with me in Ireland"


In the land of her birth we would say of her “Ni bheidh a leithéid ann arís”, in translation, “we will not see her like again”. We are lucky to have had her.


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Helen

29-09-01, 08:10 AM (GMT)
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4. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #2
 
   LAST EDITED ON 29-09-01 AT 08:12 AM (GMT)

Bruce,Brendan and Ann - thank you so much for all these wonderful details. It almost made up for missing the service. What an amazing woman she was. I'm glad some of her poems were included. It has always impressed me enormously that she was able to express herself so well in words, as well as in various aspects of ballet.

Any more impressions would be very welcome!


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Fiona

29-09-01, 04:35 PM (GMT)
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5. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #4
 
   I am still in a bit of a daze to have actually been there! It really was so very special, and an honour to have been present. A few more names come to mind: Rosalind Eyre, Gailene Stock, Clement Crisp and Lady MacMillan. (Wayne Sleep and Deborah Bull were seen outside afterwards, I heard.) All of the important guests were escorted most charmingly and with such poise up the aisle to be seated, by different older members of the R.B.S. from White Lodge, (I deducted?) Lynn Seymour linked her arm through that of the young man with her, and chatted vivaciously as they walked. She looked stunning in a 'slanted' top hat, what charisma! Did anyone see any members of the current Company of the R.B., they must have entered and departed through a side door? Perhaps it was planned intentionally, so that the emphasis was on the older generation of dancers, and the youth of the School? A young man from the School was buying a sandwich afterwards next to me, and said "What a wonderful setting for it!" and I am sure that everyone who was there will agree.


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Brendan McCarthymoderator

01-10-01, 10:54 AM (GMT)
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6. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #5
 
   The Times Court page lists some of those present at the Memorial Service.


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Bruce Madmin

01-10-01, 10:57 AM (GMT)
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7. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #6
 
   They missed us out Brendan! (perhaps they thought we had sent representatives!)


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Jane S

01-10-01, 12:44 PM (GMT)
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8. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #6
 
   I think Dame Ninette would have been really amused to see on this list, immediately after her family and leading the list of the great and the good, the name of 'Doreen, Marchioness of Londonderry' - once Doreen Wells from Walthamstow, the pride of her touring company.


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Paul A

02-10-01, 05:19 PM (GMT)
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9. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #8
 
   Everybody has said it but a few thoughts:

The inaudibility of Verity Lambert was because she was not using the microphone properly, not because of the acoustic.

My celeb spottings (aplogies for any duplication)included Monica Mason, Alexander Grant, Marguerite Porter, Desmond Kelly, Jay Jolley, Beryl Grey (wonderful hat and lapels), John Tooley (not looking well), Maina Gielgud, Derek Deane, Lord and Lady Sainsbury, Deborah MacMillan, Michael Berkeley, Lesley Collier, Merle Park, Alicia Markova etc etc! Plus the former stage door keeper at the ROH, with beard and glasses, who is now a marshal at the Abbey.

Lynn Seymour's hat was an event in itself - a black straw exaggerated trilby.

Somewhat underwhelmed by the service itself compared to MacMillan's and others I have attended there. Not convinced by the poetry - too much of that, not enough music incorporated into the service itself. To pick up on the earlier comment, the rag mazurka from Biches was created/ rehearsed on de Valois, so presumably hence its choice.

Thought the Checkmate pieces sounded good there, excellent singing from the boys in the choir, the men did not sound as though they had rehearsed. What feeble hymn singing from the congregation - what a secular nation we have become!


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Brendan

02-10-01, 05:55 PM (GMT)
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10. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #9
 
   It is interesting to see how much this thread reads like one about a performance in the theatre. It underlines just how close are liturgy and theatre - and how both engage many of the same senses.


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alison

02-10-01, 06:33 PM (GMT)
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11. "RE: Thanksgiving service for Dame Ninette de Valois, 28.09.01"
In response to message #9
 
   What
>feeble hymn singing from the
>congregation - what a secular
>nation we have become!

What a shame - after all, the hymns selected weren't particularly taxing or unknown.


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