HomeMagazineListingsUpdateLinksContexts

 


 Ballet.co Postings Pages

 Some Special Threads:
  GPDTalk about George Piper Dances ! NEW !
  NBTTalk about Northern Ballet Theatre
  SBTalk about Scottish Ballet
  ENBTalk about English National Ballet
  BRBTalk about Birmingham Royal Ballet
  TodaysLinks - worldwide daily dance links
  Ballet.co GetTogethers - meetings and drinks...

  Help on New Postings


Subject: "The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV" Archived thread - Read only
 
  Previous Topic | Next Topic
Printer-friendly copy     Email this topic to a friend    
Conferences What's Happening Topic #1727
Reading Topic #1727
Brendan McCarthymoderator

03-06-01, 01:36 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
"The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
 
   A new Executive Producer in charge of dance output will soon be appointed by the BBC. The present incumbent, Bob Lockyer, is to retire having been with the Corporation since the 1960s. A strong contender for the job, should he choose to apply, must be Ross MacGibbon, who directed ‘Ballet Boyz’ for Channel 4 as well as a number of live relays from the ROH for BBC2. MacGibbon, a former member of the Royal Ballet, is a Governor of the RB board, and he's married to Julie Kavanagh, biographer of Frederick Ashton.

A major issue facing the new Executive Producer is the scheduling of dance programmes on BBC2. The channel has gone downmarket under its present controller Jane Root – and dance has to fight harder than ever to win a place on the output. The existence of the digital channel BBC Knowledge is increasingly being used as an excuse to divert dance programmes away from BBC2. The Corporation intends soon to re-brand Knowledge as BBC4. At the Edinburgh Television Festival last August the Director-General Greg Dyke set out a prospectus for BBC4. It would be “unashamedly intellectual”, a television equivalent of Radios 3 and 4 based around music, arts and ideas. The Department of Culture, Media and Sport is likely to give a go-ahead soon after the general election.

The problem is that BBC4 will be available only to viewers with cable, satellite dishes or set-top boxes. However “Middle England” has been notably resistant to new TV technology, the result being that BBC4 is not very likely to be seen by the audience for which it is most intended. Despite this, programmes once routinely available on BBC2 are now being shown on BBC Knowledge. A case in point was the recent documentary on Anthony Dowell which was scheduled in tandem with a repeat of the RB’s Nutcracker. The rule of thumb seems to be that programmes with heavy production budgets will be shown on BBC2, but that repeats together with programmes relying on archive material (as was the Dowell documentary which largely recycled a documentary from the mid 1970s on Dowell, “All the Superlatives”) will be shown on BBC Knowledge/BBC4.

The bottom line: it is not safe to rely on BBC2 for coverage of dance on TV. It’s probably time to invest in digital.



  Printer-friendly page | Top

  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Bruce Madmin 03-06-01 1
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Jonathan 03-06-01 2
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Bruce Madmin 03-06-01 3
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Ann Williams 03-06-01 4
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Brendan 03-06-01 6
             RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Bruce Madmin 03-06-01 7
                 RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Bruce Madmin 03-06-01 8
  RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Brendan McCarthymoderator 03-06-01 5
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV pmeja 03-06-01 9
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Tomoko.A 03-06-01 10
             RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Jonathan 04-06-01 11
                 RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Caz 05-06-01 13
  RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Robert 05-06-01 12
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Pete 06-06-01 14
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV ginny 06-06-01 15
             RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Pete 07-06-01 24
  RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Jane N. 06-06-01 16
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Caz 06-06-01 17
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Brendan McCarthymoderator 06-06-01 18
             RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Caz 07-06-01 23
     RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Ann Williams 06-06-01 19
         RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Jane N. 06-06-01 20
             RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Ann Williams 06-06-01 21
                 RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV Jonathan 06-06-01 22

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Bruce Madmin

03-06-01, 07:00 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce%20M Click to send private message to Bruce%20M Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
1. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #0
 
   What a a very interesting piece - thank you. And NTL are just renewing their cable outside my door as well!

I'm also interested in the new generation of hard disk based "video recorder's" that enable much more clever recording and retrieval of material. I believe you can tell them to go record everything of a specific genere and stop and start any programme even ones going out live at that time. Sods law means I can't recall the first example.

My major aspiration is that we see much more dance on TV - this is hardly a unique request I know! But the one thing that strikes everybody is the high cost of putting stuff on TV. You only have to look at the hardware outride the Opera House and people involved in doing a recording to see that. But I often think that a simpler approach might well suffice for some works and enable more to be done for a given amount of money. Recently I saw "The King is Alive", the first Dogme film I've seen. Dogme is a movement/concept from the mid-ninties that rejected the idea of big budget filming and goes for natural light and hand held cameras. It's minimalist and inherently low budget. I enjoyed the film and I enjoyed the sparse occasionally odd or unprofessional look. Anyway I'd like to see a low budget approach tried for a mini-season of works - I think it would actually be a great success.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan

03-06-01, 07:24 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jonathan Click to send private message to Jonathan Click to add this user to your buddy list  
2. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #1
 
   Couldn't agree more, Bruce. What mystifies me is why there's so little dance compared to music coverage. You still get music when there's dance, and dancing's a lot more interesting to watch than close-ups of old men emptying spit out of their clarinets.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruce Madmin

03-06-01, 07:50 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce%20M Click to send private message to Bruce%20M Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
3. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #2
 
   >You still get
>music when there's dance, and
>dancing's a lot more interesting
>to watch than close-ups of
>old men emptying spit out
>of their clarinets.

Yes, but some do it with such panache!

I suspect its because dance is still not considered a 'real' art (high or otherwise). The one thing you notice at an Opera night is the sheer number of loud braying *men*. And while progress is being made in making it a more balanced society the old reality persists - men make many of the political and economic decisions and obviously back what they like... opera, classical music and if there has to be personal contact then it's rugby surely!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Ann Williams

03-06-01, 09:29 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Ann%20Williams Click to send private message to Ann%20Williams Click to add this user to your buddy list  
4. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #1
 
   > But the one thing that strikes everybody is the high cost of putting stuff on TV. You only have to look at the hardware outside the Opera House and people involved in doing a recording to see that<

Interestingly, I e-mailed the web-master at ROH to ask why the Dowell gala hadn't been recorded and got the following response:

"Thank you for your message which I passed onto our press department who
responded thus,

"Our events may or may not be recorded by a broadcaster, in the case of the
gala the BBC decided that they did not have worldwide market for this, the
favored kind of broadcast being full length ballet as opposed to mixed bills
or galas. The cost of filming are considerable and the broadcaster will only
commit if they know they can get a return on their investment."

I am sorry if this is a dissapointment.

Kind regards

Drew Brooke-Mellor
Webmaster, Royal Opera House"


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan

03-06-01, 10:07 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan Click to send private message to Brendan Click to add this user to your buddy list  
6. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #4
 
   >
>"Our events may or may not
>be recorded by a broadcaster,
>in the case of the gala the BBC decided that they
>did not have worldwide market for this, the
>favored kind of broadcast being full length ballet as opposed to mixed bills or galas. The cost of filming
>are considerable and the broadcaster
>will only
>commit if they know they can
>get a return on their
>investment."

This is very telling. In effect it means that the tastes of non UK audiences determine what dance programmes will be made for the BBC. One really wonders what this says about the BBC's public service obligation. The Dowell gala was of compelling interest to the UK dance audience, perhaps more so than any other dance event this year. Yet the BBC was not prepared to show it.

Does this mean that future dance coverage will be restricted to glitzy productions of the classics, 'culture snacks' such as Deborah Bull's "Travels with my Tutu", and the occasional "Dance for the Camera" as a gesture to the upper ground?. I don't dispararge the Bull series. It was great - and such popularising series are a necessary part of a dance tv portfolio. But I really begin to wonder if the Diaghilev documentaries which John Drummond made in the 1960s could be produced in today's BBC?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruce Madmin

03-06-01, 10:42 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce%20M Click to send private message to Bruce%20M Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
7. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #6
 
   >This is very telling. In effect
>it means that the tastes
>of non UK audiences determine
>what dance programmes will be
>made for the BBC. One
>really wonders what this says
>about the BBC's public service
>obligation.

At first this seems a very damming admission/point. And it is I suppose. However I can't help but feel that there is little in life theses days that is just designed or even tailored for UK consumers. The cars we drive are now world cars, Jif is now Cif becuase that's the world name and fashion is now world fashion - only have to look at all the snowboard labels which do so well here!. And how many Bristish films do you see in a British cinema these days?

Everything that is developed these days is developed with an eye to all the possible markets. It has to be because costs are high and you need a bigger market then in our case 55M people. So I can absolutely see why the BBC thinks about what will sell and help bear the huge costs of making a programme. You eventually get back to the old point that if had more public money put in - we doubled the licence fee for example - we could have better and wider programme and ones perhaps that were very British. But I don't actually think the majority of the viewing public would pay for it.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruce Madmin

03-06-01, 10:47 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce%20M Click to send private message to Bruce%20M Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
8. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #7
 
   >The cars we drive
>are now world cars

Well apart from my Morgan obviously! (and she's called Tamara!)


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

03-06-01, 09:41 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
5. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #0
 
   >MacGibbon, a former member
>of the Royal Ballet, is
>a Governor of the RB
>board

The word "board" is clearly superfluous. Perils of insomniac writing and not proof-reading. Sorry!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
pmeja

03-06-01, 12:21 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail pmeja Click to send private message to pmeja Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
9. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #5
 
   and yet i (and others) would be greatly interested! we got the documentary 'the house' here, and the canadian market got the opening and closing ROH galas (around the remodeling), though we didn't. i must take issue with the idea that the foreign market isn't there. of all people, anthony dowell is one of the most well-known, historically and in the present, of british dancers, and i believe the interest is there.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Tomoko.A

03-06-01, 01:14 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Tomoko.A Click to send private message to Tomoko.A Click to add this user to your buddy list  
10. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #9
 
   You are absolutely right, pmeja. I don't understand why they don't think the Dowell's gala would attract the foreign market. I live in the UK, but I'm well aware what's going on in Japan with regard to the ballet world. The RB is one of the most popular ballet companies and the opening gala videos are available there.And even videos for some RB's performances, which are not available in the UK, are sold there. The next issue of a monthly ballet magazine will have a coverage of the Dowell gala. They would be definitely interested in purchasing the gala video. Schame !


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan

04-06-01, 11:52 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jonathan Click to send private message to Jonathan Click to add this user to your buddy list  
11. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #10
 
   Bruce said: "Everything that is developed these days is developed with an eye to all the possible markets. It has to be because costs are high and you need a bigger market than in our case 55M people"

It's probably very naïve of me, but I do wonder why this is the case. The BBC can't always have relied on selling stuff abroad, so why is their economy so vastly different now? More people have televisions. Audio-visual technology has got cheaper and more efficient - does this not affect the cost of making programmes? And when rebuilding the opera house, was there no way in which part of it could have been hard-wired to make broadcasts simpler and cheaper?

While I see your point, that product design and marketing is becoming globalised, it is arguably the definition of a really desirable export that it has the unmistakeable je ne sais quoi of the country of origin, to borrow an imported term which has the unmistakeable je... you see what I mean.

In the sort of countries that this government and previous ones deplore, state institutions get more than their fair share of media coverage. In ours, we pay to keep the BBC and the ROH alive, and are then told that it wouldn't be profitable to show the results. If we we have to suffer the effects of a market economy, why shouldn't they?



  Printer-friendly page | Top
Caz

05-06-01, 11:27 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Caz Click to send private message to Caz Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
13. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #11
 
   I have no interest whatsoever in the BBC and I am desperately waiting for the day I get a little gadget to go with my Sky digibox that will block the BBC signal and mean I no longer have to waste my money on the licence fee for channels I've barely watched in the last 3 years. Most of the decent BBC programmes are made by outside companies and are shown on satellite channels at the same time or even before their BBC broadcasts and the large majority of their programmes interest me not at all. The BBC doesn't even make a good job of what's left of its sports coverage and then whinges when Sky does it better. They then claim that it's unfair on the viewers that they have to pay to watch sporting events on Sky when Sky are prepared to pay for them and the BBC aren't!

So how can we expect good dance coverage from the BBC when they can't even sort out something with such a vastly larger audience!?

Since everyone will have to go digital in the not too distant future in any case maybe it's time to vote with our feet so to speak and lobby Sky for a dedicated dance channel. Or what about Channel 4? They aren't afraid of spending money on dance productions on occasion.

So what that all boils down to is I'd say who cares about dance coverage on BBC - lets press for dance coverage on another channel instead, it's the BBC who'll be the losers!

PS. I realise this is even more of a burbling mess than my usual postings but Lancashire have just won the Origin Match (that's Rugby League in case you didn't know) and I'm CELEBRATING!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Robert

05-06-01, 11:14 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Robert Click to send private message to Robert Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
12. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #0
 
   If I have a television I have to pay a license fee to receive BBC television, even if I never watch it. In recent years there has been less and less on television worth watching. Weeks go by and I do not watch anything. I am told that I could see interesting programmes, the sort I used to enjoy, on BBC knowledge if I pay extra to see them. Unfortunately even if I was prepared to pay, digital television is marginal in this area and I am not guaranteed reception. I could of course subscribe to Murdoch’s SKY and get it that way but it is not worth paying for so much trash.
BBC television is in terminal decline, they would much rather put on continuos sports quizzes and pay useless comedians huge sums of money than show ballet or opera or art or much good drama. If classical music is shown or books are talked about it is usually as part of a hidden sales promotion.
The Anthony Dowell Gala should have been shown on BBC television. He is the retiring head of what is in effect the national Ballet Company and the BBC is the National broadcasting authority. There should be no consideration of foreign sales potential for an event of that sort, nor is there, when they say there is, they are not telling the truth! Even so they could easily have sold it quite a lot of foreign stations buy ballet.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Pete

06-06-01, 02:42 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Pete Click to send private message to Pete Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
14. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #12
 
   The BBC has so much responsibilty to the arts in this country, but it influences popular public opinion and then gains from it. Like a cultural conveyor belt the public seem content, through this influence, with comedic quick-fix quiz shows, an overdose of social voyeurism and depressing soaps (-ok corrie (ITV) excluded!)

Dance & especially ballet is pushed to later and later broadcast slots and with digital television, the great new concept, to the edge of availability.

Its time to start again at the beginning and to show to the most important audience of all - children, the incredible reward music & dance can offer them. Producers of children’s television hold the greatest influence in modern times. Let them help change the nadir we seem to be facing. The involvement of stars such as Geri Halliwell and films like Billy Elliot is I feel a very positive thing as is any publicity of dance, but so much more can be done to help ballet shrug off this elitist image (and uncool image if you’re a kid) it has been tarnished with for far too long. The BBC are culturally out of touch.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
ginny

06-06-01, 11:47 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail ginny Click to send private message to ginny Click to add this user to your buddy list  
15. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #14
 
   Pete's comments about ballet and dance being allocated spots at the 'dead end' of the viewing day are exactly right, particularly as he says that one of the audiences that is most 'receptive' to ballet and dance are children. They are not going to watch dance programmes that are presented at 10:00pm or later. The BBC wheels out the usual dance slots in the summer and at Christmas with the predictable ballets (The Nutcracker, etc)on offer when the success of Billy Elliott seems to indicate that part of the appeal to children (and adults) is to see other children dancing.
Recently the London Children's Ballet presented their production of 'Ballet Shoes' (beautifully choreographed by Cathy Marston with a specially composed score by Raymond Warren) - danced by children, for children. Wouldn't that fit the bill for a children's BBC dance feast, Pete?


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Pete

07-06-01, 00:28 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Pete Click to send private message to Pete Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
24. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #15
 
   >Recently the London Children's Ballet presented
>their production of 'Ballet Shoes'
>(beautifully choreographed by Cathy Marston
>with a specially composed score
>by Raymond Warren) - danced
>by children, for children.
>Wouldn't that fit the bill
>for a children's BBC dance
>feast, Pete?

That would be great wouldn't it!? Think of the new blood it would encourage into the art! A bit of foresight from one person could so influence the arts in this country.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jane N.

06-06-01, 03:39 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jane%20N. Click to send private message to Jane%20N. Click to add this user to your buddy list  
16. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #0
 
   Just a word of warning: the TV licence fee is a licence to receive television pictures from any source, not just the BBC. Yes, it is also used to finance the BBC, but you have to have a licence regardless of what channel you watch. So beware: if you are receiving television pictures in the UK you must have a current TV licence, or run the risk of a hefty fine.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Caz

06-06-01, 08:03 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Caz Click to send private message to Caz Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
17. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #16
 
   >Just a word of warning:
> the TV licence fee
>is a licence to receive
>television pictures from any source,
>not just the BBC.
> Yes, it is also
>used to finance the BBC,
>but you have to have
>a licence regardless of what
>channel you watch.
> So beware: if
>you are receiving television pictures
>in the UK you must
>have a current TV licence,
>or run the risk of
>a hefty fine.

In other words it's extortion and the sooner we are rid of it the better! Long live commercial TV!
The UK TV licence has actually made the list for the UK on http://www.dumblaws.com/
and is a standing joke to everyone else!



  Printer-friendly page | Top
Brendan McCarthymoderator

06-06-01, 08:12 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Brendan%20McCarthy Click to send private message to Brendan%20McCarthy Click to add this user to your buddy list  
18. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #17
 
   I can't imagine that Caz is serious. But in case she is, I commend to her the threads on dance on tv on some of the US websites. The correspondents get touchingly excited about the merest whisper of a re- broadcast of a ballet filmed (almost invariably) by a European state broadcaster. I don't think we need take any lessons from the United States, still less the ludicrous website that Caz mentions.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Caz

07-06-01, 00:12 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Caz Click to send private message to Caz Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
23. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #18
 
   >I can't imagine that Caz is
>serious.

I am completely serious.

>But in case she
>is, I commend to her
>the threads on dance on
>tv on some of the
>US websites.

Believe it or not we have commercial TV in this country too. One of the channels which often shows ballet is advertised at the top of this page.

>I don't think we
>need take any lessons from
>the United States

I didn't suggest we should.

>still less
>the ludicrous website that Caz
>mentions.

You don't think the fact that most of the rest of the world thinks our licence fee is laughable is worth notice? Ok, suit self.



  Printer-friendly page | Top
Ann Williams

06-06-01, 09:15 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Ann%20Williams Click to send private message to Ann%20Williams Click to add this user to your buddy list  
19. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #16
 
   >if you are receiving television pictures in the UK you must have a current TV licence, or run the risk of a hefty fine<

Jane, forgive me, but I don't understand. Surely we all know this? And what has this to do with dance coverage on TV?

As I say, forgive me if I've missed something relevant in the thread!


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jane N.

06-06-01, 10:27 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jane%20N. Click to send private message to Jane%20N. Click to add this user to your buddy list  
20. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #19
 
   Ann: I felt I ought to make some comment, as Caz mentioned wishing for a gadget to go with her Sky digibox to block the BBC signal, so that she no longer has to waste her money on the licence fee for channels she hasn't watched for 3 years. Whilst I am very aware of the fact that such a gadget doesn't exist, you'd be surprised at the number of people who still assume that they don't need a TV licence if they don't watch the BBC, and that even if such a gadget did exist you'd still need a licence to receive ANY channels. This is because you can bet your life that whichever party was in Government, they'd still find a reason to levy a licence fee, as they take a nice cut themselves.

I'm sorry if you felt it was an inappropriate comment, and you're right, it has nothing to do with the future of dance coverage on BBC TV. All I can say about that is that the whole broadcasting industry is going through some major changes at the moment, and I don't think anyone knows exactly what kind of TV we will end up with, even in the very near future. We can only hope for the best.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Ann Williams

06-06-01, 10:57 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Ann%20Williams Click to send private message to Ann%20Williams Click to add this user to your buddy list  
21. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #20
 
   Many thanks for this response, Jane. Your posting makes perfect sense now and I take you point that we can only hope for the best...


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jonathan

06-06-01, 11:25 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jonathan Click to send private message to Jonathan Click to add this user to your buddy list  
22. "RE: The Future of Dance Coverage on BBC TV"
In response to message #21
 
   Funny thing is, there were all those politicians desperate for an issue on which to hang an election, and here's one right under their noses.

If the Conservatives had only offered a Digibox with every vote, and proposed a two-tier TV licence, with a discount to people who only watched between 6.00pm and 11.00pm (thus penalising single mothers, asylum seekers, clubbers, the unemployed and people without gardens or baby sweetcorn) they would probably have got in and solved all the country's problems at once.


  Printer-friendly page | Top

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic

 
Questions or problems regarding this bulletin board should be directed to Bruce Marriott