HomeMagazineListingsUpdateLinksContexts

 


 Ballet.co Postings Pages

 Some Special Threads:
  GPDTalk about George Piper Dances ! NEW !
  NBTTalk about Northern Ballet Theatre
  SBTalk about Scottish Ballet
  ENBTalk about English National Ballet
  BRBTalk about Birmingham Royal Ballet
  TodaysLinks - worldwide daily dance links
  Ballet.co GetTogethers - meetings and drinks...

  Help on New Postings


Subject: "La Bayadere - second night" Archived thread - Read only
 
  Previous Topic | Next Topic
Printer-friendly copy     Email this topic to a friend    
Conferences What's Happening Topic #127
Reading Topic #127
Eugene Merrett

08-07-99, 05:02 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Eugene%20Merrett Click to send private message to Eugene%20Merrett Click to add this user to your buddy list  
"La Bayadere - second night"
 
   As far as Bayadere’s go they do not come as crude as this one. And the blame must fall almost entirely on Grigorovitch’s staging. This is a Cold War La Bayadere where the purpose of the Bolshoi theatre was to entertain Workers Delegation and foreign dignatories from Eastern bloc countries. That is to say everybody but true ballet fans.

The result is a non-stop dance-a-thon with far too many gratuitous and vulgar dances. There is no drama, little depth of emotion – it is just a tawdry circus act. The worse parts are undoubtedly the first two acts. Grigorovitch has piled on the dancing to an extreme degree. And it’s all bad. There is a absolutely stomach turning dances for African “sambos”. If any one wanted evidence of ballet being a decadent art form they need look no further then this production. And ultimately I am seeing a demonstration of the superiority of the Soviet Communist system which produces better and stronger people. Cheers, Comerades!

Act 3 and 4 are fairly similar to other productions in Europe and St Petersburg.
The Betrothal scenes is surprisingly unspectacular. This leads me to believe that we are seeing a cut down Bolshoi production. If we are paying over the odds for tickets then I expect to see the real deal.

The Kingdom of the Shade scene was done well but no better then the Royal Ballet and quite inferior to the Paris Opera Ballet. But the ghostly atmopshere was undermined by the incredibly fast tempi chosen by the conductor. More over the orchestral scoring is much heavier then Lanchberry version. As the result the elegant simplicity of the scene is lost. But despite these problems nothing can take away for the sheer beauty of the scene – but the Bolshoi tried hard! Again we saw just 24 girls no more then the understaffed Royal Ballet. The video I have of the Bolshoi in Moscow showed 32 girls.

The dancers were extremely well schooled. But they were dramatically inadequate. The main dancers were technically superb but in the main quite anonymous. The production and designs were fair.

It is absolutely shocking that Grigorovitch demands £100000 for this. He should being paying the Bolshoi!


  Printer-friendly page | Top

  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  RE: La Bayadere - second night Eugene Merrett 10-07-99 1
     RE: La Bayadere - second night Jane 10-07-99 2
         RE: La Bayadere - second night Stuart Sweeney 10-07-99 3
         RE: La Bayadere - second night Olga 11-07-99 4
             RE: La Bayadere - second night Bruce Madmin 11-07-99 5

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Eugene Merrett

10-07-99, 12:14 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Eugene%20Merrett Click to send private message to Eugene%20Merrett Click to add this user to your buddy list  
1. "RE: La Bayadere - second night"
In response to message #0
 
   If you thought my reveiw was tought then you should read the review in the Spectator. It was quite savage and more or less said what I said. Unless other critics it said that the Bolshoi Kingdom of the Shade scene could not have been more unpoetic!!

It pans all the dancings for their A-B emotional depth and acting ability.

Also of interest is that this production dates from 1991 -2 years after the Berlin Wall fell.

The more I think of the Bolshoi and the Kirov the more I realise that the true home of Ballet in the 20th century is England and America. Do you seriously think ballet would have parity with opera at the new ROH if it was only doing works like La Bayadere and the three Tchaikovsky ballets. I doubt it would ever catch on in England leaving the field open to the Soviets. The importance of Balanchine, Ashton and Macmillan cannot be overestimated in saving this artform.


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Jane

10-07-99, 03:09 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Jane Click to send private message to Jane Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
2. "RE: La Bayadere - second night"
In response to message #1
 
  
>The more I think of the Bolshoi
>and the Kirov the more I
>realise that the true home of
>Ballet in the 20th century is
>England and America.

Do you know anyone who disagrees? I think you're battering at an open door! When Balanchine took NYCB to Russia in 1963 they told him 'Welcome to Russia, the home of the classical ballet'; he rplied 'Thank you, but America is now home of the classical ballet. Russia is home of the old romantic ballet.'


>Do you
>seriously think ballet would have parity
>with opera at the new ROH
>if it was only doing works
>like La Bayadere and the three
>Tchaikovsky ballets.

Do you seriously think ballet will have parity with opera at the new ROH anyway? I don't. And don't forget that the Boshoi's repertoire for this tour was chosen by the Hochhausers and not by the company - they *do* do more than we're seeing here


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Stuart Sweeney

10-07-99, 03:31 PM (GMT)
Click to EMail Stuart%20Sweeney Click to send private message to Stuart%20Sweeney Click to add this user to your buddy list  
3. "RE: La Bayadere - second night"
In response to message #2
 
  
>Do you seriously think ballet will have
>parity with opera at the new
>ROH anyway? I don't.

I know what you mean Jane and if past performance is anything to go by, parity, or something close, won't be achieved. But, naive optimist that I am, I believe that Kaiser has shown that he is really interested in ballet and if he can take the Board along with him, he might be able to achieve his stated aim of parity or at least something close.



  Printer-friendly page | Top
Olga

11-07-99, 08:09 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Olga Click to send private message to Olga Click to add this user to your buddy list  
4. "RE: La Bayadere - second night"
In response to message #2
 
   I don't think that Russian ballet lost its positions. Just the level of dance and dancers increased fantasticaly. This level is more or less equal all over the world today (especially in technique of the dancers). There are a lot of talanted choreographers and dancers in many countries.
I don't think it's correctly now to say that any country dominate in the ballet life.
I can even argue with Mr.B himself. Romantic ballet is the greatness classics and Petipa is genius. They just can not be old and untimely. It's only necessary to clear Petipa from numerous of interpratations. Interpratations can become old-fashioned, Petipa - never. Pure Petipa is still divine and beyond any comparison. And the House of Petipa has always been (and will alway be) Mariinskii.
The art of Mr.B based on Petipa I think.
Mr. John Taras prepared Symphony in C with Mariinskii. After the premiere he said in his TV interview: " I've never seen the Symphony like this. Only after I saw it performed by Mariinskii ballet I realized the greatness of Balanchin completely" And I was absolutely surprised he said it in Russian (who taught him Russian if not Balanchin himself).


  Printer-friendly page | Top
Bruce Madmin

11-07-99, 09:31 AM (GMT)
Click to EMail Bruce%20M Click to send private message to Bruce%20M Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
5. "RE: La Bayadere - second night"
In response to message #4
 
   >There
>are a lot of talanted choreographers
>and dancers in many countries.

It might be splitting hairs but I think there are many great dancers, but great choreographers are in far less abundance then perhaps they have been.

There is talent and hopefully that talent will break through and move ballet and dance forward some more. But at the moment I think it is choreography and weak artistic direction (aided and abetted by apparent money difficulties) that is holding things back. In fact it is artistic direction which is probably responsible for the position on choreographers - far too little is spent on new work.


  Printer-friendly page | Top

Conferences | Topics | Previous Topic | Next Topic

 
Questions or problems regarding this bulletin board should be directed to Bruce Marriott