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Subject: "Repertoire - what repertoire?" Archived thread - Read only
 
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Bruceadmin

22-05-99, 05:12 AM (GMT)
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"Repertoire - what repertoire?"
 
   An interesting thing to debate is repertoire of companies. Usually this comes out as "what do you think should be performed over the next year" and everybody wades in with their prejudices about who has not been performed etc.
I want to suggest a different approach: instead of naming pieces I'd like to suggest categorising rep and for people to talk in terms of what percentage of the total each category should have. An example of the categories I would propose:

19h Century classics (Swan Lake, Giselle etc)
Restaged works (work not seen for more then 10 years)
Totally new works:
New works to the company (ie created elsewhere)
20th C standards: Things that are in the rep more or less as standard (R&J it seems, Fille, last years new works, restages works etc etc)

Seasons of course vary in the proportions of each, so I would suggest what we want to discuss this in the context of what we think the average over say a 4 year period should be.

An example - how about:
19th Century classics: 20%
Totally new works:15%
New works from elsewhere:15%
Restaged works: 20%
Standards:30%

So 20% of performance time should be classical rep. 15% of performance time in an average year would be new work etc.

So what percentage would you like to see against the categories?

Is there a better list of categories?

And I wonder how various companies have performed against these categories over the last few years?

Do we think that teh split we each want would actually sell in the box office?!

Final point is that I believe these metrics should not be based on performances but performance time. Its all very well talking about 5 new works being performed, but if each of them only lasts 10 minutes that is not much of a commitment to new works when compared say to a single Swan Lake that lasts 3 hours. Using time as the measure is fairest I think.



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  Subject     Author     Message Date     ID  
  Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Eugene Merrett 22-05-99 1
  Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Stuart Sweeney 22-05-99 2
     Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Eugene Merrett 22-05-99 3
         Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Stuart Sweeney 22-05-99 4
         Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Albert Einstein 22-05-99 5
             Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Arthur Daly 22-05-99 6
                 Re: Repertoire - what repertoire Eugene Merrett 22-05-99 7

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Eugene Merrett

22-05-99, 05:13 AM (GMT)
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1. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire"
In response to message #0
 
   I think that the balance laid out is great. But I do not think it will do very well at the box office. The classics and the R and Js subsidise the the more esoteric works. I am not sure if just 20% classics (cash cows) is enough. New productions are expensive and rarely sell out. (Sadlers is an exception -1500 seats and RB first performances in several months)

Perhaps a better yardstick is the number of different production. Whilst 30% of new productions may be new - only a small number of performances are done!

Rightly or wrongly the bread and butter market for Ballet is families (read mothers and daughters) for Nutcracker and Swan Lakes.


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Stuart Sweeney

22-05-99, 05:16 AM (GMT)
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2. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire"
In response to message #0
 
   >>An interesting thing to debate is repertoire of companies.


>>An example - how about:>>
>>19th Century classics: 20%>>
>>Totally new works:15%>>
>>New works from elsewhere:15%>>
>>Restaged works: 20%>>
>>Standards:30%>>
>>>>


Given Bruce's headings, three questions arise:
1. Wot I want
2. Wot regular ballet-goers want
3. Wot's good for the profit and loss account.

All 3 have their place, so here are my suggestions:

1. ME, ME, ME

19th Century classics: 15%
Totally new works:15%
New works from elsewhere:20%
Restaged works: 30%
Standards:20%

Here, we have a roughly 3-way split, between old and newer standards, restagings from the wealth of the back catalogue and work new to the company. I might even load the latter category more heavily. Restagings of 'Concerto', 'Las Hermanas and BRB's 'The Prospect Before Us' show the great work, which we see infrequently.


2. Regular Ballet-goers

Ballet.co folks will give their own views, but I suspect that what Bruce gave as an example above will not be far from the general view.


3. Max.Profit Programme

19th Century classics: 35%
Totally new works:10%
New works from elsewhere:10%
Restaged works: 10%
Standards:35%

Option 3 begins to look like the current ENB programming, except that the first and last categories would be even higher and illustrates the risks of allowing profits to dominate totally. Thank goodness the 1930s innovators of British ballet did not take this path.

Given the widely acknowledged excellence of my taste, discernment and general savoire faire, clearly Option 1 - ME, ME, ME should prevail.


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Eugene Merrett

22-05-99, 05:17 AM (GMT)
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3. " Re: Repertoire - what repertoire "
In response to message #2
 
   For maximum profit - the repertoire should be
Classics 95%
Totally new works 0000000%(negative if possible)
New works from other companies o%
Restagings 5% (only R and J)


Of the classics 90% should be Nutcraker 6% Swan Lake 2% Giselle 2% Sleeping Beauty 1%. Sleeping Beauty may bring 'em in but is too expensive. The Nutcracker was clearly choreographed with accountants in mind. It is short, does not require a huge cast and a child can be put in the leading role (equity rates for kids is less then that for adults I think). No big fees required to pay the Sugar Plum Fairy as she is on for only 10 mins.


On a more serious note - this demonstrates why art needs to be subsidised.


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Stuart Sweeney

22-05-99, 05:19 AM (GMT)
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4. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire"
In response to message #3
 
   You make a valuable point Eugene, but I was assuming that such a repertoire would also result in a sharp reduction of Arts Council grant (IT CERTAINLY SHOULD!), thus reducing profitability.


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Albert Einstein

22-05-99, 05:19 AM (GMT)
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5. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire "
In response to message #3
 
   >>For maximum profit - the repertoire should be >>
>>>>
>>Classics 95%>>

>>Of the classics 90% should be Nutcraker 6% Swan Lake 2% Giselle 2% Sleeping Beauty 1%.
>>>>
>>>>


Herr Eugene

Most thanks for tricky problem you set us. Am still working on question of number base that gives 6 2 2 1=90. Thinking I will solve Unified Field Problem before this one.

See you later (unless you go Place Below)

Albert


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Arthur Daly

22-05-99, 05:20 AM (GMT)
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6. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire"
In response to message #5
 
   >>>>(E.M.)
For maximum profit - the repertoire should be Classics 95%. Of the classics 90% should be Nutcraker 6% Swan Lake 2% Giselle 2% Sleeping Beauty 1%.

(A.E.)
>Herr Eugene
>>
>>Most thanks for tricky problem you set us. Am still working on question of number base that gives 6 2 2 1=90. Thinking I will solve Unified Field Problem before this one.
>>
It's called the Consultant's Mark-up Equation. You just add a zero to everything before presenting the bill, and take a zero off the profits before calculating salaries.

Under stress, consultants sometimes do this to the data instead of the accounts


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Eugene Merrett

22-05-99, 08:06 PM (GMT)
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7. "Re: Repertoire - what repertoire"
In response to message #6
 
   I really meant Giselle 1%.

As Captain Manwaring in Dad's Army would say "I was wondering who would spot that first?"


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